Metal Art Giveaway 2019

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Freedom Cabinet Raffle

Metal Art of Wisconsin (MetalArtofWisconsin.com, 920/717-0635) is a family-owned business in Wisconsin offering metal forming, shaping, and plasma cutting. Their custom designed art pieces hang on the walls of numerous studios, banks, museums, churches, hospitals, cemeteries, and memorials all around the world. Metal Art also makes a number of practical designs with their artistic flair.

Their 2nd Amendment collection includes metal and carbon fiber Freedom Cabinets. Both decorative and functional, these American flag-shaped cabinets are available in matte or glossy black with stripes cut from 16 gauge, cold-rolled mild steel, and finished with three layers of clear coat. A number of locking systems secure each strongbox, including invisible RFID lock, key cards, and biometric scanners. Each Freedom Cabinet comes complete with a tough, high-density foam insert that can easily be configured to store guns, valuables, booze, dirty secrets, or anything you want to conceal. Encased in a steel, lockable frame, whatever you decide to store in it will be safely hidden behind Old Glory. Available in 2, 3 and 4 foot sizes.

Freedom Cabinet Giveaway

Metal Art is giving away one of their newest models in the 2nd Amendment collection, a Biometric Fingerprint Freedom Cabinet Slider. With outside dimensions of 23 x 15.5 x 3.5 and inside dimensions of 21 x 12.5, the flag is cut from 16 gauge, cold rolled, ground and polished mild steel, then covered in three layers of glossy clear coat. The steel is inlaid and flush with the surface of wood for a three dimensional look and is all secured with a high-tech biometric (finger print) locking system.

To enter this giveaway, host a small, local shooting event. An easy, quick, scored course of fire held during a local hunter sight-in is ideal but anywhere and any type of shooting event you choose works. Submit a picture of your event along with a short description to the Editor about your shoot and we’ll put you in for the drawing. Winner will be announced in December.

Event Ideas

Hunter Bullseye: This is an ideal event to be held at your next hunter sight-in day. One cheap paper target (sample for printing at home is included) on any 100-yard range.
Hunter Bullseye download

USAR Postal Match: Conducted by the U.S. Army Reserve Marksmanship Program, these events can be held on any 25-meter range.
U.S. Army Reserve Competitive Marksmanship Program Postal Match download

Any type of event is acceptable, these are just ideas. Have fun!

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How to keep proper maintenance of your spotting scope

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by Marko Lewis

If you want to ensure that your spotting scope is in working order, simply cleaning the lens from time to time will do the trick. However, if you want your spotting scope to retain its reliability and quality, you’ll need to put some extra effort into it.

In this article we’re going to talk about how to keep proper maintenance of your spotting scope, so without any further ado, let’s get straight to it.

Routine check-ups

Whenever you are using your spotting scope, there’s a chance that something didn’t ‘click’ right as it should have. Placing it on a rocky surface might result in tiny cracks appearing here and there, that time you dropped it and thought it wasn’t a big deal might’ve been actually. Performing regular routine check-ups is the easiest way to find out if anything’s gone awry.

You should inspect each component separately, both the interior and the exterior of your scope. If there’s even the slightest damage on your spotting scope, you should fix it before you even consider using it again (so as to prevent smaller damages ‘evolving’ into major ones).

Disassembling your scope

In most cases you will be able to tell if a part of your scope isn’t functioning properly. However, routine check-ups sometimes give off the impression that everything’s alright while in fact, it isn’t.

The best way to make sure every little piece of your scope is functioning in the way it should be is to disassemble it before you get to the cleaning part. Take off the screws (and don’t forget to count them so you can re-assemble the scope later), remove the tube from its axis and use the following tools to help make the disassembly process easier:

  1. Cotton swabs are pretty handy for dusty surfaces
  2. Soap or grease if some of the screws are screwed in too tightly
  3. Tongs go a long way for the tiniest screws
  4. Magnetic screwdriver for the smallest screws

Cleaning the lens

A spotting scope lens is rather delicate. The special type of glass used in spotting scopes might or might not be durable, but the fastest way to damage it even if it’s robust as can be is by using hard brushes.

Using soft brushes and dry cleaning cloths will make a big difference. Furthermore, the method by which you clean the lens will have a huge impact on whether you’ll damage it or not. If you start from the very center and spiralling towards the edges, you’re doing a good job.

Lastly, you should avoid applying too much pressure when you’re cleaning, even if there are some persistent stains on it. Exercise patience if you want to avoid damaging, or even breaking your spotting scope lens.

Cleaning the exterior surface

Cleaning the lens was the easy part. Cleaning the exterior surface is a bit trickier. There are so many small bits and pieces on your spotting scope, all of which are quite flimsy.

You will be able to spot lumps of debris, mud, and dirty, so you shouldn’t have any problems cleaning them with a piece of cloth. It’s highly recommended that you clean both interior and exterior of your scope before each use, but more importantly, make sure to clean it afterwards as well.

If you’ve been using a piece of cloth to clean the exterior of your spotting scope without much success, it’s most likely that heavier debris got stuck onto it. Again, if you want to avoid doing damage to your scope, you shouldn’t apply too much pressure, so how should you deal with the persistent debris then?

There are various specialized cleaning products which were specifically made and intended for spotting scopes. Most of these ‘special’ cleaning tools are in liquid form, so they will be able to dissolve the debris and dirt that’s stuck on the exterior of your scope.

Proper way to storage your spotting scope

Regardless how good of a job you did with disassembling, re-assembling and cleaning of your spotting scope, it would all go to waste if you don’t store it properly.

The spotting scope lens should be covered with a special type of cover (not too big, not too small), all the screws should be put back in place, and that’s about it as far as the mechanical parts are in question.

As for the ‘where should you store your spotting scope’, it mainly depends on your personal options. Some people don’t have a shed, others live in cramped apartments, so the general rule of the thumb would be to keep it in an area that’s dry and humid-free. Obviously, moisture tends to be the biggest enemy of a lens, but it could also potentially do damage to the exterior, screws, and such.

Redding T7 Turret Press Review

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by Joseph Fox

If you’re a shooting enthusiast who is obsessed with accuracy and ready to go through the highest peak just to catch the exclusive costly gear, then Redding T7 turret press can be an interesting option for you. However, the progressive versions really need some changes!

Because with progressive presses, you barely acquire advanced features, precision, mobility, and diverse uses. I mean what’s the benefit if you can’t load ammo like benchrester Kyle brown? Nevertheless, I am going to review Redding T7 press to help you make an informed decision about the product.

Redding T7 Turret Press Review

 

Redding T-7 turret press

Firstly, I want to thank the manufactures for supremely powerful functions. Along with the sleekiest handling feature, this equipment ensures that hunters can customize reloading every time.

Secondly, the massive press which works tremendously for firearms reloading is a great plus. Also, the 7 station turret head is superbly easy to move whenever you expect the die to fall into places.
You might not know the most kick-ass part here, which is, if you combine additional turret heads with your press, then you can switch your reloader into calibres. And, this will happen without any major adjustments or hassles.
Without any additional setups, you can assemble the handle in the press-position. Initially, the spinning also lets the nuts to drop into the right place.

Then I would like to preach about the short, handy, and user-friendly feature. At first glance, you’ll find out the ball on top of the turret ram handle which remains gentle and kind in your palm.
Even if you’re in a long arc and need to hold it for a long period, it won’t convey any pain or discomfort.
Now, let’s talk about the green press body. It’s specifically crafted with cast iron and has a classy finishing with an orange peel. Sometimes, it might look alike wrinkle paint.
For instance, you might have a doubt about the inconsistency of changing dies constantly, just one after another.
But luckily, redding t7 turret press provides such pesky lock rings which can easily encounter any complications during the loading period.
Lastly, I would love to say about the shell holders and numerous die stations for multiple calibres. The universal shell holders help your hand to obtain maximum accuracy. Hence, it can be easily rotated in any direction you prefer.

• 7 Station Turret Head
The redding t7 turret press has 7 station turret heads which make the die fall into places in no time. Also, you’ll obtain absolute accuracy in each strike. However, if you grab some extra turret heads, then you can alter your reloader into calibres.
Luckily, additional turret heads are vastly available. You will find it easily and power up your reloading skills. Although the reloading process might be tricky if you are new.
Though by following the exact same steps like regular hand-holders. They usually load cases without taking it out from the shell holder.
You’ll need an onboard priming press to complete the whole reloading process. However, you can use a funnel over the opening of the cartridge with the powder charge. Moreover, with proper practice, patience, accuracy, and consistency, you can cut the chase.

• Cast Iron Construction
The cast iron configuration and the stout compound linkage helps to reload magnum cartridges with comfort. Initially, the cast iron compound bears high performance. You’ll get ample wear resistance and enough strength as well.
By all accounts, the construction is ideal for all maximum reloading process. And a press like t7 turret is bound to have that feature.

• Smart Primer Arm
Here the smart primer arm allows the small to large primers to seat adequately. Though it’s very tricky to seat the primers into tight pockets. But, with t7 turret press, you can change the game.
You need to detach the cases and prime it in a proper manner to switch the primer carefully within the presses with accurate orientation. Also, the cleaning process of primers become easy after you replace the primer in the press. However, even if you replace the index, it won’t benefit you while shooting. It will just ensure accuracy.
For your convenience, let me put it in a precise way.
Press Opening: 4.75 inches
Ram Diameter: 3.8 inch-stroke

Additionally, you’ll get a flexible hollow ram, a tubular primer configuration, and you can easily eradicate the tubular primer settings if it doesn’t fit your requirements.

• Full Die Set Semi-permanently
This extraordinary press has the biggest perk to offer. And no wonder it’s the ability to hold the consistency. Even if you expect a regular loading session or a becnhrest competition, all you gotta need is consistent loading of the cases.
Sometimes, with a progressive press, you lose the strike because of abrupt case loading. You end up lingering into changing cases and load them every time you insert a new one.

But here, you can mount a full die set which ensures a full die set semi-permanently. Moreover, this press allows all 7/8″-14 threaded dies. No doubt it’s an universal shell holder. You can’t admire more, trust me!

Pros
• Interchangeable turret heads
• Positive ram stop via powerful compound linkage
• Sufficient compatibility with smooth 1.75-inch ball
• Smart priming arm
• Additional ram stoppage

Cons
• Setting primer can be tricky for newbies
• It gets rusted easily
• The end slide bar is too long

Frequently Asked Questions
1. Are T7 turret presses better than progressive presses?
If you have a handsome budget and crave for advanced modification then in every aspect t7 turret presses are better.

2. Do dies from Lee Precision fit with this press?
Yes, certainly.

3. What are the additional features?
Positive ram stop, small removable handle for switching on station to another flexibly.

Verdict

A powerful, robust press which stands on your all-purpose reloading desires. However, the optional automatic sliding bar might not impress you as it’s not necessary in most cases.

Hopefully, the manufacturers will minimize the inconveniences in no time.

Trigger Pin?

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From a fellow Team shooter:

I just gave the Army Training Circulars about small arms training a thorough read through. Bottom line, the TCs are very much like the same stuff we’ve been teaching all along. Very little I can arguably disagree with.

Not really happy about their take on trigger follow through. They almost encourage the “hot release”, repeatedly instructing to not hold back the trigger, stating: “the longer the trigger is held to the rear the longer the Soldier prevents the pistol from functioning and delays reengagement.”

I believe a shooter can’t shoot accurately any faster than he/she can recover from recoil, so there’s no need to get the trigger reset while the sights are off the target. Thoughts?

We’re in agreement. The new TCs are an overall improvement. Now just a matter of getting personnel to read them…

Concerning the “hot release” vs. trigger pin or hold/reset, this issue is a classic example of a useful attempt at a corrective by knowledgeable people being misinterpreted by parrots and creating problems.

Pinning the trigger is taught as a method to encourage followthrough. Feeling/hearing a click is a way to help someone with poor followthrough or recoil anticipation, pre-ignition push, flinch, or other unintended movement disrupting alignment. Used well, it’s a corrective that can help establish control in trigger manipulation.

Apparently, in some law enforcement circles pinning the trigger to rear after each shot became a version of “watch your breathing” in that cadre overemphasized it to the point of it overshadowing trigger control during the shot. I’ve seen videos of struggling LEO shooters being barked at by an “instructor” to emphasize a slow, deliberate trigger reset followed by a sharp, rearward jerk because that’s what someone emphasized to them as “important.” This also needlessly slows shot-to-shot speed. An example:

https://www.facebook.com/USCCA/videos/10155770725824371/

This is rather like someone long ago thought “trigger squeeze” was a useful way to convey the idea of a smoothly-controlled trigger pull and “trigger jerk” a way to describe unintended movement during shot release. The first is sometimes misinterpreted as squeezing with the whole hand as you’d normally do when, say, squeezing a lemon. The second is often misinterpreted by implying the “jerk” is mostly or solely due to the index finger on the trigger and not an unintended reaction from the rest of the shooter’s body.

Any of a number of correctives might be useful if they’re coming from someone knowledgeable enough to make the distinction. These same correctives can be potentially detrimental when overemphasized by personnel that don’t really understand what or why they’re emphasizing it.

As expected, a top shooter like Ernest Langdon is spot on. The error is “training” this reset as a required technique instead of using it to briefly emphasize followthrough for someone that isn’t otherwise getting it.

Traits of the Very Best Leaders

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Spoiler: It’s also the opposite of every drill sergeant stereotype and other incompetent leaders in the military.

Google’s research is in line with the Disciplined Disobedience approach that the Army is supposed to be following but very personnel actually do.

1. Be a good coach.
You either care about your employees or you don’t. There’s no gray zone. If you care, then you’ll invest time and energy to help your employees become better versions of themselves. That’s the first 50 percent of being a good coach.

The other half is knowing you’re a facilitator, not a fixer. Ask good questions, don’t just give the answers. Expand your coachees’ point of view versus giving it to them.

2. Empower teams and don’t micromanage.
Absolutely no one likes to be micromanaged. Research indicates empowered employees have higher job satisfaction and organizational commitment, which reduces turnover and increases performance and motivation. Also, supervisors who empower are seen as more influential and inspiring by their subordinates.

Everyone wins when you learn to let go.

3. Create an inclusive team environment, showing concern for success and well-being.
Individual fulfillment is often a joint effort. People derive tremendous joy from being part of a winning team. The best managers facilitate esprit de corps and interdependence.

And employees respond to managers who are concerned about winning, and winning well (in a way that supports their well-being).

4. Be productive and results oriented.
Take productivity of your employees seriously and give them the tools to be productive, keeping the number of processes to a minimum.

5. Be a good communicator — listen and share information.
The biggest problem with communication is the illusion that it has taken place. It often doesn’t happen because of a lack of effort from both the transmitting and the receiving parties. Invest in communication, and care enough to listen.

Former CEO of Procter & Gamble A.G. Lafley once told me his job was 90 percent communication–communicating the next point especially.

6. Have a clear vision/strategy for the team.
With no North Star, employees sail into the rocks. Enroll employees in building that vision/strategy, don’t just foist it on them. The former nets commitment, the latter compliance. And be prepared to communicate it more often than you ever thought you could.

7. Support career development and discuss performance.
The best managers care about their people’s careers and development as much as they care about their own. People crave feedback. And you owe it to them.

People don’t work to achieve a 20 percent return on assets or any other numerical goal. They work to bring meaning into their lives, and meaning comes from personal growth and development.

8. Have the expertise to advise the team.
Google wants its managers to have key technical skills (like coding, etc.) so they can share the “been there, done that” experience. So be there and do that to build up your core expertise, whatever that might be. Stay current on industry trends and read everything you can.

9. Collaborate.
In a global and remote business world, collaboration skills are essential. Collaboration happens when each team member feels accountability and interdependence with teammates. Nothing is more destructive for a team than a leader who is unwilling to collaborate. It creates a “it’s up to only us” vibe that kills culture, productivity, and results.

10. Be a strong decision maker.
The alternative is indecision, which paralyzes an organization, creates doubt, uncertainty, lack of focus, and even resentment. Strong decisions come from a strong sense of self-confidence and belief that a decision, even if proved wrong, is better than none.

https://www.inc.com/scott-mautz/google-tried-to-prove-managers-dont-matter-instead-they-discovered-10-traits-of-very-best-ones.html

Tactical Application of Competition Shooting

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Listen to Mike. And shut up.

Mike Pannone is a former operational member of U.S. Marine Reconnaissance, Army Special Forces (Green Beret) and 1st SFOD-D (Delta) as well as a competition USPSA pistol shooter holding a Master class ranking in Limited, Limited-10 and Production divisions. He has participated in stabilization, combat and high-risk protection operations in support of U.S. policies throughout the world as both an active duty military member, and a civilian contractor. After sustaining a severe blast injury Mike retired from 1st SFOD-D and worked as a Primary Firearms Instructor for the Federal Air Marshal Program in Atlantic City and the head in-service instructor for the Seattle field office of the FAMS. He also worked as an independent contractor and advisor for various consulting companies to include SAIC (PSD Iraq), Triple Canopy (PSD Iraq), and The Wexford Group (Counter IED ground combat advisor Iraq and pre-deployment rifle/pistol/tactics instructor for the Asymmetric Warfare Group). Mike was also the Senior Instructor for Viking Tactics (VTAC), and Blackheart International. He started his own consulting company full time in late 2008.

Recoil Anticipation

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I’d argue that recoil anticipation (also known as flinch, pre-ignition push, trigger jerk, and a variety of cuss words…) is the single biggest detriment to novice shooters. Novice here also includes gun owners, law enforcement, and military personnel with years and decades of “experience” that never developed shooting ability beyond passing routine qualification.

Learning how to overcome (or at least greatly reduce) the very natural tendency to react to recoil, noise, flash, and movement of a discharging firearm while attempting to maintain alignment on target is the most single most important thing a firearm user can do to improve proficiency. This also increases the ability to followthrough and call shots, critical to refining a shot process.

The lack of attention paid to this critical element of successful shooting is the biggest reason why many gun owners, law enforcement, and military personnel never progress beyond the elementary, initial, basic skill levels used during initial entry , basic, academy training. Far too many personnel are not even aware of this being an issue and most of them completely fail to actively address it.

For intermediate shooters, DRY FIRE DOES NOT FIX RECOIL ANTICIPATION BECAUSE KNOWLEDGE CHANGES EXECUTION . Here’s the proof right here and this is extremely common. Slight disruption to the gun sufficient to cause a miss as distance increases. At close range, people often chalk this off to sight picture when actuality it’s a slight case of recoil anticipation. Take this back to 15 or 25 yards, it’s a miss. This drill works great with a partner but if you’re working alone, try mixing in some dummy rounds. Facts not opinions is what I am after. Hold yourself accountable and fix your deficiencies.

Note, this doesn’t mean that dry practice isn’t useful and won’t help at all. Continued dry practice will continue to enhance (or at least maintain) the ability to more rapidly obtain sufficient alignment on target and manipulate the trigger without causing disruption. The point is that after a certain point of development, dry practice alone won’t magically fix recoil anticipation because it’s purposely done dry/empty (obviously) and knowledge of that removes that tendency. Only intelligent exposure to live fire, preferably done with dummy rounds (skip loading and other approaches) and perhaps additional feedback from sensors (MantisX, SCATT, etc.), can do this.

If you want to get stronger, you need to subject yourself to the stress of lifting heavier weight, preferably done with intelligently-programmed increases. If you want to eliminate recoil anticipation, you need to subject yourself to recoil, preferably done with intelligently-programmed intermittent exposures (training partner loads as demonstrated below, dummy rounds, intermix shooting with lower recoiling firearm/cartridge, etc.)

https://www.facebook.com/114008039194217/videos/vb.114008039194217/435200330372416/

More on this:

https://firearmusernetwork.com/grooving-bad-habits/

https://firearmusernetwork.com/training-and-habits/

https://firearmusernetwork.com/misplaced-tactical-training/

https://firearmusernetwork.com/pistol-shooting-questions/

https://firearmusernetwork.com/head-shots-are-still-misses/

https://firearmusernetwork.com/shooting-basics-uspsa-idpa-ipsc/

https://firearmusernetwork.com/dummies-steal-dummy-rounds-smart-shooters-use-them/

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