Hunter Drills

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List of useful articles on shooting drills for hunters:

http://sportsmansvintagepress.com/marksmanship-for-hunters/

http://m.thetandd.com/sports/outdoors/marksmanship-and-respect-for-the-whitetail-deer/article_8275b324-4660-11e2-83b8-001a4bcf887a.html?mobile_touch=true

http://www.boone-crockett.org/news/featured_story.asp?area=news&ID=222

http://www.outdoorlife.com/blogs/gun-shots/2013/01/shooting-range-drill-snipers-and-down

http://www.outdoorlife.com/blogs/gun-shots/2013/01/shooting-range-drill-how-speed-run-bolt

http://www.outdoorlife.com/blogs/gun-shots/2013/01/shooting-range-drill-how-shoot-keyhole

http://www.grandviewoutdoors.com/big-game-hunting/the-best-answer-to-any-anti-hunter-attack/

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Doctors: Acute and Chronic Conditions

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Dr. Austin Baraki is a medical doctor, strength coach, and competitive powerlifter. Here are his thoughts on dealing with tweaks, pains, strains, and other issues.

[During a routine barbell training session], I had programmed myself to work up to one heavy set of 5 on beltless pause squats. I worked up to 500×5 without any issues, and decent technique (other than too-short pauses).

However, after the set I began to feel significant low back pain, similar to prior “strains” and “tweaks” I’ve experienced. It persisted through the evening, overnight during sleep, and through the next day.

I didn’t panic, agonize over what could have happened, how I could have prevented it, or when I’m ever going to be able to lift again. I knew that sometimes these things just happen, maintained confidence that there wasn’t anything seriously wrong, and knew that it would improve on its own.

The next day, I began warming up for my 1.5” deficit deadlifts normally. I gradually worked up to this PR set of 5 with minimal symptoms during the set and no significant exacerbation afterwards.

Fear and Expectation have HUGE influence on symptoms and outcomes in people experiencing pain. One of the strongest predictors of who will improve the most/fastest are those who have the best expectations… NOT whether it’s your “SI” or “QL”, what type of manual therapy, stretching routine, or even what exercise program you do.

For someone experiencing pain, fear, and negative expectations (like expecting their pain to “flare up” in the gym), working them through a process like this under close guidance and reassurance shows them that they CAN, in fact, move without severe symptom exacerbation. This is known as Expectancy Violation, and is a useful tool in altering expectations and facilitating better outcomes.

Think back on your own experience: what thought processes/patterns do you have that might be influencing your symptoms and outcomes? Try to take control of them!

– Dr. Austin Baraki

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1.5” Deficit Deadlift PR: 560×5 😈 • On Thursday of this week’s training, I had programmed myself to work up to one heavy set of 5 on beltless pause squats (shown in second video). I worked up to 500×5 without any issues, and decent technique (other than too-short pauses). • However, after the set I began to feel significant low back pain, similar to prior “strains” and “tweaks” I’ve experienced. It persisted through the evening, overnight during sleep, and through the next day. • I didn’t panic, agonize over what could have happened, how I could have prevented it, or when I’m ever going to be able to lift again. I knew that sometimes these things just happen, maintained confidence that there wasn’t anything seriously wrong, and knew that it would improve on its own. • Fear and Expectation have HUGE influence on symptoms and outcomes in people experiencing pain. One of the strongest predictors of who will improve the most/fastest are those who have the best expectations … NOT whether it’s your “SI” or “QL”, what type of manual therapy, stretching routine, or even what exercise program you do. • The next day (today), I began warming up for my 1.5” deficit deadlifts normally. I gradually worked up to this PR set of 5 with minimal symptoms during the set and no significant exacerbation afterwards. • For someone experiencing pain, fear, and negative expectations (like expecting their pain to “flare up” in the gym), working them through a process like this under close guidance and reassurance shows them that they CAN, in fact, move without severe symptom exacerbation. This is known as Expectancy Violation, and is a useful tool in altering expectations and facilitating better outcomes. • Think back on your own experience: what thought processes/patterns do you have that might be influencing your symptoms and outcomes? Try to take control of them!

A post shared by Austin Baraki, MD (@austin_barbellmedicine) on

I don’t know if it’s meme-based medicine, a need to always have an answer when a patient asks, or ego that says they MUST know regardless of actual knowledge that causes this.

The medical profession overall is wonderful at dealing with trauma and medication-based solutions, and god-fucking-awful at dealing with chronic conditions – including aging – that aren’t readily routed around with a pill or injection.

There are a phenomenal number of doctors who have little knowledge of either weight training or nutrition and yet authoritatively opine to their patients complete nonsense on both topics rather than using that magical phrase “I don’t know.”

– Steve Klein

MMA: Lies of Gurus

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Turns out Mixed Martial Arts suffers the same nonsense as shooting:

http://www.scrapdigest.com/five-fake-martial-arts-exposed-mma-fighters/17397/

“Any NCO with the FM”

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From Mike Lewis

Here’s the problem as I see it. The primary role of the NCO is training Soldiers, yet NCOs in general are lacking. This isn’t their fault because one can’t effectively teach what one was never taught. I didn’t get to attend MMTC before retiring and it was still a pilot then, but 200 NCOs a year doesn’t get the Army healthy.

Drill Sergeants come from all over the Army. They get marksmanship in DS school, but at what level and from whom? How much time out of those few weeks is dedicated to learning things never previously learned in any formal training environment before coaching and diagnosing problem shooters, or is it just the bare basics? I say this because a vast number in the formation never got any formal instruction in weapons employment after BCT and much of the stuff floating around is “I learned this from my buddy in Group or Regiment” while not giving context and/or getting it wrong.

This leads to what we see here. It won’t get fixed until the Army takes small arms training seriously and quits collectively lying with green blocks on Command and Staff slides then never progressing beyond baseline skills for qual.

Get Gun Owners To Be Shooters

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https://ricochet.com/422134/taking-it-off-the-streets/

Taking It Off the Streets
By Kevin Creighton

There’s been a tremendous increase in gun ownership in the past few years, but that gun-buying bubble will pop unless those new gun owners find something to do with their guns other than keeping them unloaded under their beds and hoping they will keep the bad guys away.

Owning a gun should not be a fad. CB radios went away because people found out that there was little to do with a CB except talk to truckers. If we want guns to be something other than tactical pet rocks, we need to introduce gun owners to activities they can do to improve their ability to use a gun under stressful conditions, without throwing them into the ring of competition right from the start with little or no training.

Enter Shoot and Scoot Range Days, put on by Step By Step Gun Training.
https://stepbystepguntraining.com/ssgt-scoot-and-shoot/

This event features simple, easy to follow practical shooting stages that use reactive steel targets to give instant feedback on whether you hit the target (or not) and easy-to-follow courses of fire that use shooting boxes to delineate what targets must be engaged from which positions. The round counts are low (under 25 rounds per stage) and most importantly, the focus of the Range Day isn’t on winning a match, it’s on improving your skills and getting comfortable with carrying a gun in a holster.

A typical Shoot and Scoot Range session consists of two pistol-shooting bays set up for easy-to-shoot courses of fire for people who want to work on drawing from a holster and safely moving with their gun and a bay with a more advanced course of fire that brings in the defensive use of a rifle into the mix. In addition to range officers (who get a big discount on the practice fee in return for their services) on each stage, there’s also a instructor dedicated to teaching first-time attendees how to safely draw from holster and move with their gun. The sessions are three hours long, which is enough time to run through all the courses of fire at least three times, and while timers are in use on the stages, scores are not kept, and the time is used more to gauge personal improvement than who recorded the fastest time on the stage.

Shoot and Scoot Range Days aren’t there to give people a chance to win a match, they’re to give people the experience of being at a match. Attendees get a taste of what it’s like to safely operate a firearm under a small amount of simulated stress, without the stage fright and anxiety that comes from being judged by your peers on your performance. More importantly, people at this event get a feel for what it’s like to carry a gun around on your hip for hours on end.

You would think that’s a common thing among people who have their concealed carry permits and own a defensive pistol, but you’d be wrong. At a recent industry-only event put on by the National Shooting Sports Foundation, some participants were amazed by how few people within the firearms industry itself had any experience drawing a gun from a holster and putting rounds on-target. [This same problem exists among uniformed military personnel.]

If this is the case inside the firearms industry, imagine what it’s like for those on the outside. If we want “Gun Culture 2.0” to truly become a culture, that means that the having a defensive firearm on you or near you needs to be as natural and as normal has having a smartphone on you or near you at all times.

How to detect baloney the Carl Sagan way

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1. Reliability of source, evidence, and its quality.
2. Has anyone tried to disprove the claim/theory; has it been tested or replicated?
3. Do personal beliefs influence the evidence? Is there an agenda?
4. Does the new idea being proposed account for the ideas of the old idea and the new anomalies?
5. Does the claimant play by the rules of science?

Karl Rehn: Beyond The One Percent

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This says it. We need local trainers, training in 4 hour (or so) blocks in a progressive program – each piece at a lower cost and with shorter round counts – to facilitate people getting training.
What we have now isn’t working.

– Rich Grassi

Karl Rehn is a long-time trainer and high-ranked competitive shooter. Here are a number of resources on reaching beyond the one percent, those rare but important and skilled shooters that seek out experience beyond required minimums.

http://blog.krtraining.com/category/guns/beyond-the-one-percent/

http://proarmspodcast.com/098-beyond-the-one-percent/

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