Canadian Sniper Record Shot: An Analysis

4 Comments

I’m sure you heard about a Canadian sniper that reportedly set a new world record by taking down an ISIS target from a distance of about 2.2 miles. The exact distance of the shot was 11,316 feet (3,772 yards), taken by a special forces sniper from Canada’s Joint Task Force 2. In an official Forces Canadiennes statement, “The Canadian Special Operations Command can confirm that a member of the Joint Task Force 2 successfully hit a target from 3,540 metres [2.2 miles].”

http://www.range365.com/canadian-sniper-breaks-record-with-22-mile-shot/

http://www.duffelblog.com/2017/06/canadian-sniper-kill-shot-record/

One suggested motivator for this:

Here’s a commentary about this. Please comment with your thoughts below.

Jason Brown
https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=42212919

A dozen shots at a dozen ISIS combatants 2 miles away and you’re bound to hit one. The vital zone is smaller than the zone where a quarter of the shots under controlled conditions would land. These guys are never alone. If he could reliably hit one with one shot, one kill certainty, then why weren’t there multiple kills? The reason is that this was a lucky shot.

Ten inch vital zone at 3,540m is 0.25MOA. That rifle shoots 0.5MOA BEFORE you throw in the Coriolis effect, which will move the point of impact between 7 to 10 inches depending on the actual time of flight of the bullet, but can’t be can’t be determined any better than that due to variability in muzzle velocity from shot to shot. That time of flight is also going to be affected by the inconsistent air density along the 4km arc of flight. This will also affect the amount of spin drift. Mathematically, this is like hitting a bullseye that’s smaller than the point of the dart. Do the math. Learn about long range shooting. Spend some time on the thousand yard range with guys that hold world records. Or better yet, answer that question – If this was a reliable one shot kill, why was there only one kill when the ISIS combat doctrine presents multiple targets…

This was walked into a crowd just like Craig Harrison’s shots, no doubt about it. World record 1,000yd benchrest is 0.3MOA where Coriolis is negligible with handloads that have a standard deviation of only a few feet per second and heavy support on concrete bases that weigh a ton. Obviously, a tactical rifle is not going to match that, and at over triple the distance, that group will open up due to variables that cannot be calculated such as uneven air density which no ballistic computer will predict. Hitting that first shot, cold bore is statistically like rolling six-sized dice and getting a 6.33, or measuring 0.0004″ with digital calipers that read to the nearest 0.001″, or measuring your speed to 1/10th MPH with a speedometer that has an accuracy of plus or minus 1MPH. If the error ellipse is larger than the target, the hit probably is less than 1.

A Farr Shot: First Time Shooters

Leave a comment

I’m sometimes asked what I’d do if a person without competition experience showed up and won the match.

That’s easy. I’d offer congratulations and applaud loudly. Because that’s what happens when anyone wins.

George Farr was an unknown shooter using improvised and borrowed equipment. He managed to set a record at his first appearance at Camp Perry during the National Matches. His first-time appearance was so inspiring that the Farr Trophy was created in his honor and is still rewarded to the top shooter using a Service Rifle during the NRA Long Range Nationals.

Admiring shooters surrounded George on all sides and it wasn’t long before someone suggested that the rifle and its shooter deserved to stay together. A collection taken up from fellow competitors representing several state teams made it possible for Farr to purchase that rifle. A silver plate for the left side of the rifle was engraved to commemorate the event. But the story doesn’t end there.

The next year, the Civilian Team Trophy was re-designated as the Farr Trophy. George Farr’s record string on the old target system was never beaten.

Birth of a Legend: The Farr Rifle
https://www.ssusa.org/articles/2016/4/21/birth-of-a-legend-the-farr-rifle/

Farr Trophy
http://competitions.nra.org/documents/pdf/compete/nat-trophy/tro-073.pdf

In case you’re wondering how the experienced competitors will treat you if you show up to your first match and win something big, something equally amazing will happen to you as did Mr. Farr. But ya gotta show up first…

There’s a reason we have to go all the way back to 1921 to remember a remarkable performance from a first timer.

MSG Norman Anderson: Being Of Service Rifle

1 Comment

An interview with one of High Power’s greatest competitor and coach, MSG Norman Anderson.

http://www.beingofservicerifle.com/interview-norm-anderson/

US Marine Scout Sniper Documentary

Leave a comment

Here’s a summary: Take what you learn by attempting to win shooting matches and apply that improved skill and knowledge to the field environment.

Carlos Hathcock Interview
“What I used when I was sniping, I learned when I was competing.”

Sadly, they overlooked Chief Warrant Officer Arthur Terry as having originally started the program in Hawaii at the Pu’uloa Range Training Facility near ʻEwa Beach and Pearl Harbor (now Joint Base Harbor-Hickam). Gunner Terry’s sniper program trained Carlos Hathcock.

Gunner Terry served as a sniper in Korea. More accurately, he used his competition shooting experience with an accurized service rifle to engage specific targets. Upon returning to the States, he was assigned to Marine Corps Base Hawaii, running a shooting team and starting a formal sniping program in the 1950s. This began being known as the Scout Sniper program as scouting was required to first find a target and high level shooting skill was required to get hits.

Terry had officially retired after Korea, however, Major General Alan Shapley, then-commanding general of the Fleet Marine Force, Pacific, “reacquired” him for a single purpose: Developing a sniper program, starting with the shooters from the Marine Rifle and Pistol team in Hawaii. Shapley was preparing for future conflicts after Korea. Terry was given a new service number and “unretired” into a Warrant Officer position with the mission of turning shooters into snipers. Given his sniping experience in Korea, Gunner Terry was directed by FMF brass to start this program. It wasn’t unusual for Shapely or generals from 1st Marine Division dropping in to Terry’s office for updates.

Arnold Vitarbo and John Verhaal were among the skilled competitive shooters on Gunner Terry’s cadre. Jim Land and Carlos Hathcock were some of their first students.

Another interview of a Viet Nam era sniper:

Olympic Shooting and the value of sport

Leave a comment

Recent interest in #rio2016 Olympics resurected a post about whether shooting is a real sport:
https://firearmusernetwork.com/is-shooting-a-real-sport/

Interestingly, Duelling has been a competitive shooting event.

One of the lesser known Olympic events, pistol dueling was a popular sport in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. It was certainly not the deadly past time of generations earlier, where young gentlemen killed each other over matters of honor. Rather pistol dueling had transformed in a safe sport. Conventional pistols were used, however they fired cartridges with wax bullets which lacked gunpowder, the wax bullet being propelled by the force of the primer only. Contestant wore a mask to protect the face, and the pistols had special shields to protect the user’s hands.

Pistol dueling was introduced in the 1906 Olympics, but was discontinued after the 1912 Stockholm Olympics. A poll conducted before the 2000 Sydney Olympics showed that 32 percent of respondents would like to see dueling pistols reinstated as a sport.

So force on force was used as a competition shooting event in the Olympics over a century ago. Here’s yet another example of competition shooters doing something long before tactical types found it cool.

NMC shooting with the M1 Garand

2 Comments

The sitting and prone rapid fire stages of the National Match Course were changed to a two and eight sequence when John Garand’s M1 became our issue service rifle. Given the design’s eight round en block clip, loading with eight is obviously no issue. Setting up two rounds can be accomplished without too much fuss by twisting the cartridges in a standard clip. Given this is done before record time begins, it may be fiddly but not a major hassle.

Here’s how to make this procedure easier:

How to make two-round Garand clips
http://www.fulton-armory.com/%5Cfaqs%5CM1G-FAQs%5C2clip.htm

http://www.midwayusa.com/product/1895311304/aggressive-engineering-m1-garand-clip-steel-parkerized

Handling single rounds for the slow fire phase remains awkward. John Tate explains how to make this more convenient.

It’s nice to see all the emphasis on M1 shooting and use in competition. One awkward aspect was loading for slow fire prone. Then I was given a “single shot clip.” What a wonderful assist!

The essence is a standard M1 clip is modified so that it can be inserted into an otherwise empty M1 receiver, where it remains due to a lip that catches on the side of the receiver “rail.” Then, with the bold locked to the rear, the follower in combination with the clip’s lips (R or L) will retain a cartridge just as would an M14 magazine.

To shoot, just push in a cartridge, and release the bolt in the identical fashion to an M14.

If you were an M1 shooter, you would understand what a blessing this is, especially in prone where inserting a cartridge is a pain (it will slip back out due to the muzzle being elevated), or tripping the bolt (just plain awkward in prone).

M1 Garand single shot sled:

High Power with Issue Rifles

1 Comment

How much of a difference does match grade equipment make compared to standard, rack grade, issue rifles and ammunition? National champion CPT Freeman of the USAR Service Rifle Team shares his experience in competing with both.

By actual test, the difference in score between a top end match grade rifle with highly refined sights and trigger, ammunition, and shooting accessories (padded shooting coat, sling, glove, etc.) is less than 15%, even with a beat up, bottom-edge issue rack-grade rifle and ammunition with no refinements and no shooting accessories. It will likely be even less in most cases.

BLUF: Scores are earned by skill. Even the best match grade equipment can only account for the last few percentage points in the score.

Older Entries

%d bloggers like this: