John Tate on “Assault Rifles”

Leave a comment

1. “Assault weapons” have several characteristics: the two main ones are low power & selective fire. Functionally, these interact. Selective fire means either semi- or full-automatic fire are options. Low power so the arm is controllable in full-auto mode.

2. Accurate, full-auto firing is a non-sequitur. Single shots are for specific targets; full-auto is in fact an area weapon. And becoming effective with full-auto is: (a) very expensive in ammunition consumed and barrels ‘shot out,’ (b) it’s by physics, inaccurate – which is why we call it ‘spray and pray,’ (c) and of little avail for the casual or sport shooter … because of a & b.

3. Given any level of proficiency, a manually operated rifle (e.g., a bolt gun) and a semi-auto have about the same capability for aimed fire. Want a demo? Here are links to some Norwegian competitions. The first link is just to a bolt gun shooter (using the 1890’s vintage Krag-Jorgenson action). The second & third are not only a face-to-face competitions between bolt guns and semi-autos, but the bolt guns win! #3 also features lady shooters! They are deadly accurate!! Watch Jenny Stene and her bolt gun. (Note: she pulls the trigger with her ring finger.)


(at 5:25 is a Krag shooter)
(at 7:40 is a semi-auto competing against bolt guns; note the bolt guns shoot faster, Miss Stene wins the round AND beats the gas gun.)

4. I won’t belabor the point … beyond this: I was a competitive highpower rifle shooter for 10 years. I used an M14. (It was the “assault weapon” predecessor of the M16. It wasn’t practical for full-auto because it fired the .308/7.62 cartridge … too powerful for controlled full-auto fire.) I often shot against bolt guns. With a skilled shooter, the bolt guns won because they (a) fired just as fast, and (b) were more accurate.

5. The gross ignorance of the media and their hyperbole of presentation AND the general ignorance of the man-on-the-street and consequent vulnerability to the media distortions are what has propelled the AR-15 to such depths of public disdain. Indomitable ignorance is far more dangerous than ARs!

Advertisements

If it looks silly, but works … it ain’t silly

Leave a comment

Notes from Rifle Fundamentals: Breath and Hold Control

It is said that 600 yards separates the men from the boys. Maybe, but for me, offhand shooting is hardest. The illustration at the head of the article linked below shows two tools to make offhand a bit steadier.

1. Hip support for the support elbow. Yes, both male and female usually need to push the forward hip out to get better support. Looks silly – but it works.

2. Note how far back toward the trigger guard is the shooter’s support hand. (In fact, I use the trigger guard for my forward support.) What does this accomplish? The longer the moment arm, the slower the oscillation. This characteristic of oscillations is most commonly observed in grandfather clocks. And, like a clock, put a bigger weight at the end of the moment arm and oscillations will again slow.

One more ancillary comment – the article is about breathing. But while breathing and getting oxygen for your muscles and brain, you can use that time to improve your ability to see.

1. Blinking your eyes will spread basal tears that will keep your cornea clean, clear, nourished and lubricated.

2. Simply closing your eyes, or looking at something green, will help the retina recover from your eyes previous staring at the sights & target. The relatively long term and intense fixed staring at black-and-white sights and target will ‘burn’ these images into the retina, making the ability to discriminate these a bit harder. The remedy – look somewhere restful, or simply close your shooting eye.

By the way – the comments above about moment arm and eye sensitivity recovery apply to all phases of shooting, not just offhand.

More:
https://www.ssusa.org/articles/2018/1/8/rifle-fundamentals-breath-and-hold-control/

Lones Wigger: 1937-2017

Leave a comment

“The will to win is really better stated as the will to prepare to win. In shooting, it’s persistence that pays the biggest dividends—constant, steady practice, week in and week out, all year long. I truly believe that anyone can be a champion marksman if they work at it long and hard enough.”

– Lones Wigger, LTC, USA (Ret)

COL Lones Wigger was a four-time Olympian and the most decorated shooter in the world.

Legends: Lones Wigger 1937-2017
by Hap Rocketto

https://www.ssusa.org/articles/2017/12/15/legends-lones-wigger-1937-2017/

Sling Use

2 Comments

Sling Use
by John Tate

I’m a firm believer in slings for long guns for several OBVIOUS reasons:

  • Hands-free while hands-on. Once a perp is located and needs to be hooked-up, you gotta put that long gun somewhere safe and secure. Voilá – the sling.
  • Shooting position stability. The sling, if properly used, reduces wobble and may remove the need for muscle support (all positions except offhand).
  • Hands-free when traveling. Think “sling arms.”

My background is the classic 1907-style leather sling. But I’ve also used the one-piece web sling. Either works as a “hasty sling.” And the web sling can be disconnected from the butt for an upper-arm-to-rifle-forearm config.

I’m not familiar with the modern one-point and … well, I don’t know the name(s) for modern around the neck and around the back-shoulder options.

Full disclosure: Virtually all my sling experience is with the military two-piece leather or one-piece web sling. For either, the only quick option is the hasty sling. Otherwise, whether kneeling, sitting or prone, a different length is needed, which means individual adjustment prior to going into position. When I was a kid and did a bunch of hunting, it was mostly along the central eastern seaboard around Piedmont NC. I always had a tree for standing support; so I didn’t need slings, sticks or bipods.

Czech government tells its citizens how to fight terrorists: Shoot them yourselves

Leave a comment


Guns from a previously held firearms surrender are displayed at police headquarters in Manchester, England. (Andrew Yates/Reuters) [Editor's Note: I'm noticing a few non-firing orange and blue guns turned in to the firearms surrender.]

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/worldviews/wp/2017/01/06/czech-government-tells-its-citizens-how-to-fight-terrorists-shoot-them-yourselves/

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/europe/czech-government-citizens-how-to-fight-terrorism-a7515671.html
More

Safety – Safariland 7390 holster

Leave a comment

From John Tate.

Please immediately discontinue the use of the Safariland Holster 7390. A problem has been identified when holstering the weapon. During the holstering procedure, it is possible for a small piece of the holster, located internally (pictured below), to catch the tip of the trigger and move it towards the rear. While we do not believe it possible for the trigger to travel far enough to cause the weapon to fire, such movement clearly should not occur at all.

Safariland has been notified of the problem and is actively working on a solution.

Please advise your personnel to immediately discontinue the use of this holster and return to the holster that they were using prior to the 7390.

Tate-Safariland-7390

Remembering Fundamentals

Leave a comment

from John Tate

“Military actions are distilled down to shooting, moving, and communicating.”

“The most dynamic of the basics is shooting, and shooting well requires technique, accuracy, effect on target, and an understanding of what you are shooting at. This is a complex skill set, including everything from rifles/artillery to submarine-launched precision-guided missiles and close air support. Those that are doing the shooting and those that are directing the shooting need to be trained and exercised constantly.”

On a related note: Have you ever shot a Highpower match where (for example at 600 yds) the fog/haze/rain was so dense that your couldn’t clearly see your target? So you use a “berm hold” for elevation. Or, same distance, the wind exceeded your rifle’s windage, and you had to aim at the next target over? These are both examples of off-set aim points; attack aircraft crews use the same techniques when using RADAR significant objects as aim points with bomb navigation corrections that will achieve a hit on the intended target.

Every artillery officer knows the effect of wind(s) at altitude(s) on ballistics.

Over-the-horizon targeting can employ similar relational aiming techniques.

My point, the comment of aiming being “a complex skill set” is fully on target. And having all warriors skilled in small arms will likely have positive transfer to other warfare skills.

The service of the author, LTC Ray McFall, USMC (1986 – 2008), overlapped with that of Gen A.M. Gray’s tour as commandant (1987–91). You may remember, Gen Gray said, “every Marine is a rifleman.” That philosophy may have been impressed on McFall during his formative years. But even as a sailor, I’m firmly of the belief that every warrior should be confidently competent with small arms and thus his basic psyche permeated with the skill and will to kill.

Here’s hoping Mattis can return our military to a fighting force with only that focus.
*
http://www.americanthinker.com/articles/2016/12/shoot_move_and_communicate_back_to_the_basics.html

Older Entries

%d bloggers like this: