Redding T7 Turret Press Review

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by Joseph Fox

If you’re a shooting enthusiast who is obsessed with accuracy and ready to go through the highest peak just to catch the exclusive costly gear, then Redding T7 turret press can be an interesting option for you. However, the progressive versions really need some changes!

Because with progressive presses, you barely acquire advanced features, precision, mobility, and diverse uses. I mean what’s the benefit if you can’t load ammo like benchrester Kyle brown? Nevertheless, I am going to review Redding T7 press to help you make an informed decision about the product.

Redding T7 Turret Press Review

 

Redding T-7 turret press

Firstly, I want to thank the manufactures for supremely powerful functions. Along with the sleekiest handling feature, this equipment ensures that hunters can customize reloading every time.

Secondly, the massive press which works tremendously for firearms reloading is a great plus. Also, the 7 station turret head is superbly easy to move whenever you expect the die to fall into places.
You might not know the most kick-ass part here, which is, if you combine additional turret heads with your press, then you can switch your reloader into calibres. And, this will happen without any major adjustments or hassles.
Without any additional setups, you can assemble the handle in the press-position. Initially, the spinning also lets the nuts to drop into the right place.

Then I would like to preach about the short, handy, and user-friendly feature. At first glance, you’ll find out the ball on top of the turret ram handle which remains gentle and kind in your palm.
Even if you’re in a long arc and need to hold it for a long period, it won’t convey any pain or discomfort.
Now, let’s talk about the green press body. It’s specifically crafted with cast iron and has a classy finishing with an orange peel. Sometimes, it might look alike wrinkle paint.
For instance, you might have a doubt about the inconsistency of changing dies constantly, just one after another.
But luckily, redding t7 turret press provides such pesky lock rings which can easily encounter any complications during the loading period.
Lastly, I would love to say about the shell holders and numerous die stations for multiple calibres. The universal shell holders help your hand to obtain maximum accuracy. Hence, it can be easily rotated in any direction you prefer.

• 7 Station Turret Head
The redding t7 turret press has 7 station turret heads which make the die fall into places in no time. Also, you’ll obtain absolute accuracy in each strike. However, if you grab some extra turret heads, then you can alter your reloader into calibres.
Luckily, additional turret heads are vastly available. You will find it easily and power up your reloading skills. Although the reloading process might be tricky if you are new.
Though by following the exact same steps like regular hand-holders. They usually load cases without taking it out from the shell holder.
You’ll need an onboard priming press to complete the whole reloading process. However, you can use a funnel over the opening of the cartridge with the powder charge. Moreover, with proper practice, patience, accuracy, and consistency, you can cut the chase.

• Cast Iron Construction
The cast iron configuration and the stout compound linkage helps to reload magnum cartridges with comfort. Initially, the cast iron compound bears high performance. You’ll get ample wear resistance and enough strength as well.
By all accounts, the construction is ideal for all maximum reloading process. And a press like t7 turret is bound to have that feature.

• Smart Primer Arm
Here the smart primer arm allows the small to large primers to seat adequately. Though it’s very tricky to seat the primers into tight pockets. But, with t7 turret press, you can change the game.
You need to detach the cases and prime it in a proper manner to switch the primer carefully within the presses with accurate orientation. Also, the cleaning process of primers become easy after you replace the primer in the press. However, even if you replace the index, it won’t benefit you while shooting. It will just ensure accuracy.
For your convenience, let me put it in a precise way.
Press Opening: 4.75 inches
Ram Diameter: 3.8 inch-stroke

Additionally, you’ll get a flexible hollow ram, a tubular primer configuration, and you can easily eradicate the tubular primer settings if it doesn’t fit your requirements.

• Full Die Set Semi-permanently
This extraordinary press has the biggest perk to offer. And no wonder it’s the ability to hold the consistency. Even if you expect a regular loading session or a becnhrest competition, all you gotta need is consistent loading of the cases.
Sometimes, with a progressive press, you lose the strike because of abrupt case loading. You end up lingering into changing cases and load them every time you insert a new one.

But here, you can mount a full die set which ensures a full die set semi-permanently. Moreover, this press allows all 7/8″-14 threaded dies. No doubt it’s an universal shell holder. You can’t admire more, trust me!

Pros
• Interchangeable turret heads
• Positive ram stop via powerful compound linkage
• Sufficient compatibility with smooth 1.75-inch ball
• Smart priming arm
• Additional ram stoppage

Cons
• Setting primer can be tricky for newbies
• It gets rusted easily
• The end slide bar is too long

Frequently Asked Questions
1. Are T7 turret presses better than progressive presses?
If you have a handsome budget and crave for advanced modification then in every aspect t7 turret presses are better.

2. Do dies from Lee Precision fit with this press?
Yes, certainly.

3. What are the additional features?
Positive ram stop, small removable handle for switching on station to another flexibly.

Verdict

A powerful, robust press which stands on your all-purpose reloading desires. However, the optional automatic sliding bar might not impress you as it’s not necessary in most cases.

Hopefully, the manufacturers will minimize the inconveniences in no time.

Review: Convict Conditioning

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Deceptive hype overshadowing semi-decent bodyweight exercise advice that can had for better elsewhere

Convict Conditioning is an example of what’s wrong with most fitness advice as it is primarily image and hyperbole overshadowing a bit of potentially useful advice. Here author “Paul Wade” (Google “Paul Wade identity” for sources claiming this is a pseudonym) uses prison hype to sell a “hard core” image for bodyweight exercise as better than anything else while providing no evidence to back up the claims.

Looking past the prison images that are merely public domain pics from the government (see page 288, Acknowledgements) the main model/demonstrator for this book is Jim Bathurst, founder of the excellent Beast Skills website. If “Paul Wade” is this awesomely strong guy built with bodyweight exercises, who claims to have won various Powerlifting meets with his methods (but doesn’t even bother to make up and lie about a total at said events) why not demo himself? I mean, a former convict could save the money instead of hiring Bathurst and then block out his face with Photoshop to hide his identity if necessary.

Given that Jim Bathurst demonstrated this instead of the author, how did he develop his ability? Visit his Beast Skills website to confirm:

“I like to incorporate barbell training (power lifting and olympic lifting), as well as gymnastic and bodyweight exercises. … I feel that bodyweight training and weight training complement each other very well. I’ve gotten the impression that some people feel they have to choose between one or the other. Or that one is superior to the other. I hate to see a divide in two types of training that will both ultimately improve your body.”

One Legged Squat (The Pistol)

“Method One – Squats!
Weighted squats are an incredible exercise, and going nice and low with them helps build some incredible strength in your legs. This ended up being the only method I used. Seriously, the only one. I had worked rock bottom squats for several months before I had even heard of the pistol, but I was able to pick up the skill very quickly and easily because I had developed strength in the necessary range of motion.”

One Arm Chin-up / Pull-up

“Weighted Chins
The weighted chin was a major exercise I worked on while training for the OAP, much more important than doing endless unweighted chinups. I would highly recommend you work this exercise. This was my bread and butter.

How much extra weight do I need to do in my weighted chin-up before I can do a one arm chin-up? Perform a chin-up with 2/3 of your current bodyweight for 2-3 reps and you’re close.”


Beginner Handstand Pushups

“Now the obvious question – can’t I just work my military press in the gym? Sure you can. I love to work heavy shoulder presses myself.”

“Paul Wade” lists Bert Assirati (page 13) as an example to justify his claims. Yet, Assirati developed his strength primarily with weight training. In 1938 he set an unofficial world record Deadlift at 800 pounds along with squatting 550 pounds for ten reps. He could press of 160 pounds with one arm, clean and jerk 360, and press 285. On his 16th birthday his father took him to a physical culture show and after watching a demonstration by Alan P. Mead, Bert’s father bought him a barbell set from Mead, which included notes and a training program from Mead.

John Grimek (page 26) was a member of the 1936 US Olympic Weightlifting Team and York Barbell Club.

On a personal note, I’ve found my ability to perform bodyweight exercise has improved greatly since training with barbells because barbell training got me stronger than a bodyweight exercise approach ever did.

Convict Conditioning leaves you with one possible approach to bodyweight exercise (among plenty of others) surrounded by unsubstantiated claims by an anonymous author, a hard sell of bodyweight exercise done by running down weight training (with no evidence, along with examples and demonstrations by people that were successful because of their weight training), all set to a tone glamorizing a prison “hard time” chic. I was interested in this book upon finding it in a library and am glad I didn’t waste money on it, though I’m disappointed the library did.

If you’re interested in bodyweight exercise, Jim Bathurst at his Beast Skills website has a number of free tutorials along with expanded manuals for sale. He is the real deal and doesn’t need hype or a pseudonym to do it. Even “Paul Wade” paid him to demonstrate.

The Range Complex

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The Range Complex
Review by Estaban Montoya Martinez

If you want to be the best shooter that you can be, you need to find the best instructors out there. The Range Complex was started by former members of 1 SFOD-Delta, or Delta Force. They have been there and done that, and will help make you better.

I was highly impressed by the 3 Day pistol/carbine course at The Range Complex, and disappointed it wasn’t 5 days long. At the end of it I was able to make a 100 yard shot with my iron sighted Springfield XDm, and was shooting much better with my AR-15. Forewarning, this is not a beginner’s course. The experience I’ve had from shooting Infidel Gunfighter League matches as well as practicing with Service Rifle and Pistol aided my understanding and implementation during this course. However, they weren’t as useful for this particular course as I had originally thought.

Greg Wilson, the instructor of the course I attended, has received the Presidents Hundred nine times in Service Pistol and Distinguished Pistol. He was in the Army Marksmanship Unit and renowned enough that 1 SFOD-Delta requested that he train them how to shoot better on multiple occasions. He has decades of experience and wisdom on shooting. He is known to put his money where his mouth is by shooting against his own students while teaching the course. Greg has a wealth of information and will answer any and all questions that you have.

Starting out, we shot Pistol at 25 yards toward an NRA bullseye target. This seems strange until you realize that it’s hard, and you cannot improve without seeing how far you can push yourself. Shooting at this distance also highlights the errors individuals make in grip, sight alignment, and trigger squeeze that are often hidden at closer distances. It WILL make you better.

I learned during this course that gun handling and shooting are two separate skills. Gun handling you want to do as fast as possible so that you can slow down to make a good shot.

There were several drills that were covered and were explained, the Bill Drill, Cadence Drill, Slow Fire, Target Transitions, Cadence Drills.

There are a lot of things that I and others learned from the course that will help you out with any course you take:

  1. Have proper cold/wet weather gear for the environment, God gets to vote on the weather.
  2. Ensure that you are physically in shape for the course, it’s not too demanding but does require slight physical activity all day.
  3. Ensure that your equipment is good to go, having iron sights off on a pistol or not enough ammo/belt equipment can put a damper on training time. (Though TRC will bend over backwards to help you)
  4. Words mean things, read and comprehend the course flyer.
  5. If you’re traveling, they can secure your weapons/ammo in a DOD approved weapons facility where they are safe.

This course is well worth the money and the time, and I’m looking forward to getting back to one, and using the skills learned there to improve my own skills even more. You’re missing out by not attending.

United States Rifle, Caliber .30, M1 (M1 Garand) Unreliable

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Debates about whether or not the current service rifle is good enough are not new. It seems when a rifle reaches legendary status, said rifle is deemed infallible. Things like the AK-47 with its legendary status have the myth that the weapon is unjammable, a myth perpetuated because of its history and status.

ARMY: Report on the Garand
Mar. 24, 1941
Time Magazine

http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,884292-1,00.html
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The Officer’s Guide To Police Pistolcraft by Michael E. Conti

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The Officer’s Guide To Police Pistolcraft by Michael E. Conti
A review by John Veit

The Officer’s Guide To Police Pistolcraft is a new (2009), comprehensive, practical, and reality-based survival guide for today’s Police Officer.
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Only useful for 39 million handgun owners

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Shooter’s Guide to Handgun Marksmanship
by Peter Lessler
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Stainless S&Ws and Pachmayrs

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Stainless S&Ws and Pachmayrs
by Robert Kolesar

Like most here, I like older blued S&Ws (especially the early 50’s guns) and stocks of walnut. On my working guns, though, I prefer Pachmayrs. They fit my hand well, are rugged and control recoil. And they’re cheap. What’s not to like? Here’s some of my working Smiths that get carried or shot daily.
Bob

From the top: M68 LAPD .38, M67-1 .38, M66-3 .357, M649 .38.

Here’s two of my "shooters". Top is a modified 68 in .38 (used in bullseye competition) and bottom a 66-3 that also is heavily used (PPC and bullseye) in practice. Notice the patridge front sights. Both have also had endshake removed, carry-up modified and pulls slicked up. Both are superb target guns.

Close up of a great front sight, installed by the factory several years back. Far superior to the red-ramp.

My favorite Pachmayr; small Presentation, no finger grooves. Preferably without the gaudy Pachmayr emblem. Pure function.

My old LAPD duty revolvers. Top is my issued 67; I got it new in the Academy. It wears the original Pachmayrs I bought for it in the old Pachmayr store in LA in ’84 when I was a recruit. It is usually within reach when I’m at home. Bottom is my 649, which I won in my 1st PPC match. It also wears its original Pachmayrs. It’s stil DAO, modified by the LAPD Armory when I picked it up from the LAPD Revolver Club.

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