Drills and Skills…not one in the same…

Leave a comment

http://handguncombatives.blogspot.com/2017/09/drills-and-skillsnot-one-in-same.html

Dave Spaulding

SKILL: the ability, coming from one’s knowledge, practice, aptitude, etc., to do something well with a high expectation of success.

DRILL: any methodical, repetitive, or mechanical training, instruction, or exercise. Proof of skill.

Skill is the ability to perform an activity with a high expectation of success cold. A drill…in our case a shooting drill… is intended to show proof that a skill(s) can be performed. Skills must be learned, understood, practiced, mastered and then anchored to a level of what the motor learning community calls automaticity or what many think of as “auto pilot” or “unconscious competence”.

In a gunfight…where we are fighting to save our life or the life of someone we care about… we can’t be thinking about how to perform the skills that will make us victorious, we need to be focusing on the fight itself, what our opponent is doing and what actions (based on our anchored skills) we can take to counter his/her moves. The shooting part of this conflict must be performed without conscious thought. If there were ever a time to perform a skill(s) to a high level of success COLD this would be it! What are the chances you just finished a 300 round practice session when your gunfight breaks out?

What part does shooting drills play in this process? Is shooting a drill the same as winning a gunfight? Should we be overly fascinated with popular shooting drill? To my way of thinking, a drill is nothing more than a test of a skill or skill sets. Emphasis should not be placed on shooting a successful drill, but on executing the needed skills at a high level so the drill will be a success…they are not the same thing. Instead of practicing the drill over and over until success is achieved, the student of combative pistolcraft should practice the required skills for that drill! This includes the smooth and efficient “chunking” together of skills into one fluid motion. As a matter of fact, it is this “chunking” process that makes any drill important as a drill is not a fight…it is merely a practice method for the anchoring of skills so they can be performed together automatically.

To become a “slave” to any particular drill is just silly, but I see it all the time. Regularly, my students tell me “I’ve been practicing the 2x2x2 Drill almost every day” and I ask “why?” “So I can win the buckle” is the normal response. Wrong answer. While practice is certainly worthwhile, it is the wrong train of thought. The 2x2x2 Drill is meant to test the skills of a smooth draw (from the student’s normal mode of carry), the gun arriving where it is needed, a clean trigger depression and recoil control performed in conjunction with the restaging of the trigger for the second shot. In reality, there is a lot going on in a very short time frame. My response to these students? “Don’t practice the drill, practice the skills that will make the drill a success!” It’s all in how you think about the process…

Drills should reinforce the proper execution and application of skill sets…they should not become the central focus of the student’s practice regime. They should be the test of the skills practiced and nothing more. Yes, it is fun and challenging to shoot such drills, but they are a means to and end and not the end result! To my way of thinking, drills should be shot at the beginning of a practice session COLD so they can offer an indication of where you stand in regards to skill development. To shoot them over and over until success is achieved is just false expertise.

In addition, the drills should be difficult…a challenge! If the shooter can do the drill on demand without difficulty then the skills required are ether anchored or the drill is just something the shooter likes to do, is good at and is not really a challenge. The drill should also have meaning! I see many instructors use drills in courses they like or look good shooting, but what do they mean? How do they advance student skill?

For example, my Fifteen to the Third Drill requires the shooter to draw and fire five rounds at fifteen feet into a 3 x 5 card, move laterally fifteen feet, plant and shoot five more into a 3 x 5 card before moving laterally again to the original position for five more rounds. What does it mean? The drill is used to get the student to chunk together the essential skills of drawing, shooting accurately (a 3 x 5 card is roughly the size of the heart and aorta), controlling recoil, moving explosively of the X to another position, planting, shooting accurately and then changing direction ASAP. It must be shot in 12 seconds to offer a sense or urgency. The drill can be found on the Handgun Combatives web site (www.handguncombatives.com). These are skills that have been used in actual gunfights time and again.

At Handgun Combatives, every drill we use in our courses is meant to reinforce a skill…or set of skills…that we feel is ESSENTIAL to prevailing in conflict and we always explain these reasons. We do not do arbitrary, random, trendy or the like. Our drills are challenging, meaningful and require regular practice in order to complete them successfully on demand. Even though they are drills of my creation I cannot do them successfully unless I have been practicing the required skills. Yep! I fail regularly…but I then know what I need to work on…something drills are really good at telling us.

Shoot drills by all means…but shoot them with purpose and do not let them control your practice sessions. Remember, practice is training and training is preparation…preparation is undertaken because you are smart enough to know you need it!

Advertisements

Target Angle and Hunting

Leave a comment

Shot placement is arguably the most important component of field marksmanship, right after having the experience to know when a given shot opportunity is high percentage for you.

Two articles you must review before getting ready for fall hunting season:

https://www.grandviewoutdoors.com/big-game-hunting/whitetail-deer/where-to-shoot-a-deer

https://blog.1800gunsandammo.com/target-angle-for-hunters/

Tom Givens and Mas Ayoob

Leave a comment

https://www.glocktalk.com/threads/summary-of-gunfights-by-students-of-tom-givens.1619533/

From Mas Ayoob

I didn’t keep count of mine over the years. Success rate has been the same. One was wounded by a guy who ambushed him on the street and shot him in the leg; when the gunman saw my grad drawing his .357 he fled into a crowd, and my guy didn’t shoot for fear of hitting a bystander. I think my folks may have had a higher percentage of home invasion shootings vis-a-vis street incidents.

Here is Tom Givens‘ reply:

“I am on the road teaching, so this will have to be fairly brief.

First, to the best of my knowledge, one student of mine was robbed at gunpoint while armed and elected not to draw his weapon. He was caught unaware and when he first saw the robber the suspect had a gun pointed at my student. The student elected to comply and the robber took off running as soon as he had the wallet. The student was unharmed, but by sheer luck. His situational awareness sucked. Since neither side fired any shots, this event is not included in our stat’s.

“I never said my students were pumping gas in a majority of their incidents. I said the majority of the incidents occurred on parking lots. We have had students engaged on the parking lots of gas stations and convenience stores, but also the parking lots of banks, grocery stores, large malls, restaurants, strip shopping centers, and office buildings. They have also been engaged in driveways, garages, front yards, and a few in their homes.

“Parking lots in this country are not dark, with rare exceptions. Commercial locations, especially, tend to be very well lighted. I have seen my sights better on a convenience store parking lot at 3:00am than on an overcast day at 3:00pm.

“I hope this helps.” — Tom Givens

Minimum Defensive Shooting Skills
https://firearmusernetwork.com/minimum-defensive-shooting-skills/

Hunter Drills

Leave a comment

List of useful articles on shooting drills for hunters:

http://sportsmansvintagepress.com/marksmanship-for-hunters/

http://m.thetandd.com/sports/outdoors/marksmanship-and-respect-for-the-whitetail-deer/article_8275b324-4660-11e2-83b8-001a4bcf887a.html?mobile_touch=true

http://www.boone-crockett.org/news/featured_story.asp?area=news&ID=222

http://www.outdoorlife.com/blogs/gun-shots/2013/01/shooting-range-drill-snipers-and-down

http://www.outdoorlife.com/blogs/gun-shots/2013/01/shooting-range-drill-how-speed-run-bolt

http://www.outdoorlife.com/blogs/gun-shots/2013/01/shooting-range-drill-how-shoot-keyhole

http://www.grandviewoutdoors.com/big-game-hunting/the-best-answer-to-any-anti-hunter-attack/

MMA: Lies of Gurus

2 Comments

Turns out Mixed Martial Arts suffers the same nonsense as shooting:

http://www.scrapdigest.com/five-fake-martial-arts-exposed-mma-fighters/17397/

“Any NCO with the FM”

Leave a comment

From Mike Lewis

Here’s the problem as I see it. The primary role of the NCO is training Soldiers, yet NCOs in general are lacking. This isn’t their fault because one can’t effectively teach what one was never taught. I didn’t get to attend MMTC before retiring and it was still a pilot then, but 200 NCOs a year doesn’t get the Army healthy.

Drill Sergeants come from all over the Army. They get marksmanship in DS school, but at what level and from whom? How much time out of those few weeks is dedicated to learning things never previously learned in any formal training environment before coaching and diagnosing problem shooters, or is it just the bare basics? I say this because a vast number in the formation never got any formal instruction in weapons employment after BCT and much of the stuff floating around is “I learned this from my buddy in Group or Regiment” while not giving context and/or getting it wrong.

This leads to what we see here. It won’t get fixed until the Army takes small arms training seriously and quits collectively lying with green blocks on Command and Staff slides then never progressing beyond baseline skills for qual.

Get Gun Owners To Be Shooters

Leave a comment

https://ricochet.com/422134/taking-it-off-the-streets/

Taking It Off the Streets
By Kevin Creighton

There’s been a tremendous increase in gun ownership in the past few years, but that gun-buying bubble will pop unless those new gun owners find something to do with their guns other than keeping them unloaded under their beds and hoping they will keep the bad guys away.

Owning a gun should not be a fad. CB radios went away because people found out that there was little to do with a CB except talk to truckers. If we want guns to be something other than tactical pet rocks, we need to introduce gun owners to activities they can do to improve their ability to use a gun under stressful conditions, without throwing them into the ring of competition right from the start with little or no training.

Enter Shoot and Scoot Range Days, put on by Step By Step Gun Training.
https://stepbystepguntraining.com/ssgt-scoot-and-shoot/

This event features simple, easy to follow practical shooting stages that use reactive steel targets to give instant feedback on whether you hit the target (or not) and easy-to-follow courses of fire that use shooting boxes to delineate what targets must be engaged from which positions. The round counts are low (under 25 rounds per stage) and most importantly, the focus of the Range Day isn’t on winning a match, it’s on improving your skills and getting comfortable with carrying a gun in a holster.

A typical Shoot and Scoot Range session consists of two pistol-shooting bays set up for easy-to-shoot courses of fire for people who want to work on drawing from a holster and safely moving with their gun and a bay with a more advanced course of fire that brings in the defensive use of a rifle into the mix. In addition to range officers (who get a big discount on the practice fee in return for their services) on each stage, there’s also a instructor dedicated to teaching first-time attendees how to safely draw from holster and move with their gun. The sessions are three hours long, which is enough time to run through all the courses of fire at least three times, and while timers are in use on the stages, scores are not kept, and the time is used more to gauge personal improvement than who recorded the fastest time on the stage.

Shoot and Scoot Range Days aren’t there to give people a chance to win a match, they’re to give people the experience of being at a match. Attendees get a taste of what it’s like to safely operate a firearm under a small amount of simulated stress, without the stage fright and anxiety that comes from being judged by your peers on your performance. More importantly, people at this event get a feel for what it’s like to carry a gun around on your hip for hours on end.

You would think that’s a common thing among people who have their concealed carry permits and own a defensive pistol, but you’d be wrong. At a recent industry-only event put on by the National Shooting Sports Foundation, some participants were amazed by how few people within the firearms industry itself had any experience drawing a gun from a holster and putting rounds on-target. [This same problem exists among uniformed military personnel.]

If this is the case inside the firearms industry, imagine what it’s like for those on the outside. If we want “Gun Culture 2.0” to truly become a culture, that means that the having a defensive firearm on you or near you needs to be as natural and as normal has having a smartphone on you or near you at all times.

Older Entries

%d bloggers like this: