Gov’t Study: Buyback programs do not work

Leave a comment

My conversations with shooters in Australia indicate that their massive buyback program was used by many to dump unsellable firearms they no longer wanted.

Government agencies that have formally studied the result found the scheme failed to produce claimed results.

“Although gun buybacks appear to be a logical and sensible policy that helps to placate the public’s fears, the evidence so far suggests that in the Australian context, the high expenditure incurred to fund the 1996 gun buyback has not translated into any tangible reductions in terms of firearms deaths”

https://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/Abstract.aspx?id=246605

– National Criminal Justice Reference Service

ABOUT National Criminal Justice Reference Service
Established in 1972, the National Criminal Justice Reference Service (NCJRS) is a federally funded resource offering justice and drug-related information to support research, policy, and program development worldwide.

More:

https://theconversation.com/factcheck-qanda-did-government-gun-buybacks-reduce-the-number-of-gun-deaths-in-australia-85836

Anti-gun Professor Stops Stereotyping Gun Owners After Talking To Gun Owners

2 Comments

Even though this English professor still claims to not like guns, even after learning the basics of shooting, she does admit that she no longer stereotypes gun owners. Not ideal, but it is progress. And it’s something we hear of often. If people are willing to be open-minded and try shooting or even just talking to gun owners they often walk away with a vastly different take on the Second Amendment and those of us who believe so strongly in it.

To that end, we as gun owners need to do our part to win over anyone willing to hear us out. That means being open and friendly to those who may not necessarily share our exact views on freedom, gun ownership and self-defense.

This happens one person at a time, and one conversation at a time. But before that process can begin those non-gun owners have to feel comfortable approaching us. And more often than not that process begins by being open and approachable.

Major kudos to the instructor at the Butch Olafson Range who took that phone call from a very nervous English professor. And kudos to Ms. Spaulding-Kruse for owning up to and overcoming your fear, as well as moving past your preconceived stereotype of gun owners. You still may not like guns, but if you ever want to go shooting again look us up. We’re happy to continue your education on shooting sports and gun ownership.

http://iowafc.org/blog/english-prof-in-ia-stops-stereotyping-gun-owners-after-talking-to-gun-owners/

Strength Training Effects on Endurance

Leave a comment

Three groups of runners were equalized as Novices (layoff from any training for an equal amount of time) and then conducted the same running program. The training difference was the three groups used a 5×5 strength training program (“heavy strength training”), 3×5 lifting with plyometrics (“complex training”), and high repetition (“endurance strength training”).


The two group training with sets of five (5×5 or 3×5 with plyo) had similar good benefits to their running results while the high rep group had the worst results despite being novice trainees in an endurance sport.
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32981468/


https://trainright.com/why-heavy-strength-training-is-most-effective-for-runners/

“HST (heavy strength training) and CPX (complex training, mix of strength training with plyo) produced similar improvements in maximum strength, power (as ascertained through the squat jump and countermovement jump) running economy and vV02max. Additionally, HST and CPX resulted in greater eccentric strength and running economy improvements than the low weight, high repetition EST (endurance strength training), which showed some marginal and not significant improvement. This adds to the body of literature that overall favors heavy and/or plyometric strength training being superior to low weight, high repetition strength training specifically for running (and in many cases other types of endurance) performance.


“In addition to this, one of the interesting ways the research team standardized the groups was that all of them abstained from strength training for the prior 6 months before the intervention. Normally when this is the case, any intervention results in a meaningful positive adaptation simply because the training stimulus is novel as well as an overall increase in training load (you are adding strength training on top of your normal run training). So, when you look at the fact that the EST (low weight, high rep) produced basically no response despite the intervention being additive to the underlying run training load and despite it being novel, you could easily say that it was a waste of the athlete’s time.

“The literature is starting to demonstrate more and more, you are better off taking that time you are spending doing a billion bodyweight step-ups and redirecting it into a handful of heavy squats”

Michael Owen Nails the Gun Debate

Leave a comment

https://bretigne.typepad.com/on_the_banks/2017/10/michael-owen-nails-the-gun-debate

Michael Owen Nails the Gun Debate

1*5DMj0UqutOE8XY_-DJtG6Q

This is the best commentary I’ve seen on the gun debate ever. And Michael Owen needs to start his own (real) blog:

“No amount of statistics or facts will sway either side in the gun control debate, because they are all looking for simple solutions to complex problems. The facts of those complex problems are uncomfortable and nobody really wants to come to grips with them.

“For example, we don’t really have a single America with a moderately high rate of gun deaths. Instead, we have two Americas, one of which has very high rates of gun ownership but very low murder rates, very comparable to the rest of the First World democracies such as those in western & northern Europe, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, Japan, South Korea. The other America has much lower rates of gun ownership but much, much higher murder rates, akin to violent third world countries.

“The tough questions are those like, why do we have these two Americas? But that’s an uncomfortable discussion to have. So instead those on the left favor simple minded restrictions that target first world America, with its high gun ownership but very low murder rate, but don’t address the root causes of third world America’s violence at all. Meanwhile those on the right correctly feel their civil rights are constantly threatened, so they are constantly in a state of “better stock up before they finally ban it” and the guns and ammo fly off the shelves. The left’s constant gun control rhetoric is the greatest thing ever for arms manufacturers.

“Meanwhile, over the past 40 years, while the number of guns in private hands has doubled, the murder rate has dropped by half. The left are constantly prattling about “assault weapons” which are almost never used to commit murders (about 1% of gun murders; all rifles combined are around 3%). More murders are committed with baseball bats than “assault rifles”; the vast majority of gun homicides are committed with handguns, but it’s easier to sell restrictions that target “assault weapons”, even though such restrictions, even if 100% effective, would make no detectable change in the murder rate (especially because of substitution effects). They favor ridiculous measures such as bans on “high capacity magazines”, as if magazines weren’t cheap and easily swapped out in a fraction of a second.

“The uncomfortable fact is that roughly 80% of the US homicide rate is associated with the drug trade, and the drug trade is violent because the drug war reserves it for violent criminals. We have a system in place where the government subsidizes poverty in urban areas, imposes economic blight in those same areas through heavy taxes and regulations, renders the residents permanently unemployable via the “criminal justice” (sic) system, and creates a lucrative black market in drugs by restricting supply (not to mention increasing demand as people are desperate to escape their circumstances by getting high), meaning the only game in town is often entering the drug trade. The drug trade is violent because those in it have no access to courts to settle disputes. Powerful industries lobby to keep the drug war going; the top spenders are law enforcement unions, the prison industry, big alcohol, tobacco, and pharma.

“Guns are not the proximate cause of gun violence in the US. Childlike magical thinking and simple “fixes” to complex problems will not work. But it is comfortable, and self-righteousness feels so good. So I expect it to continue indefinitely.”

How to Reduce Injuries Related to Recoil

2 Comments

by Jay Chambers

Hunting is a very exciting sport to indulge in. Also, a gun is a great thing to have around for self-defense. Plus, we can’t help but appreciate how fun it is to go to the shooting range or an airsoft camp. It can help us relieve built-up stress and make us feel psychically better after a long week at work.

However, the part that is not so fun is recoil. Sure, loud noises may be brought down by a good pair of earmuffs – but what do you do about recoil? Recoil injuries can get out of hand very quickly, often leaving severe traumas that even doctors have difficulties in handling. That being said, in order to reduce these injuries, there are several tips that you may want to consider. Check them out!

  • Get a Good Recoil Pad

In most cases, the recoil pad will determine whether your gun will have a lot of recoil or very little recoil. Sure, aluminum or plastic recoil pads – the ones that generally come with the gun – are among the least expensive options. However, they are more likely to injure you with their recoil.

This is why you might want to go for a soft, padded recoil pad instead, as it can suck up the recoil. Rubber is also a good choice, as it is very efficient at absorbing shock and has vibration isolation properties. Make sure that the length of the pull works well with the size of your recoil pad.

  • Go for Recoil Reducing Stocks

There are various stocks that you can buy that have counterweights, spring systems, or other mechanical additions meant to reduce the recoil. These are not necessary for low recoil levels, as they can get quite expensive – but if the recoil particularly bothers you, you may want to invest in something like this.

For example, you can use it if you have a weapon large enough to use a rifle scope for 500-yard lines – as these guns create a bit of recoil. Moreover, you need to protect your gun accessories. Even if you have a short hunting range, recoil can injure you and your gear – and these recoil-reducing stocks are great for preventing that from happening.

  • Use Reduced Recoil Ammunition

Sometimes, you may have the perfect gun that barely has any recoil and the best tools to dampen the effect of the recoil. However, if the ammo you are using is going at full power, then you may expect a lot of recoil as well. Plus, think about it this way: do you really need to push yourself for no reason with full-power ammunition each time you are at the shooting range? You can be sure that ammo such as a 5.56x45mm NATO will have quite a bit of recoil.

That being said, every major shotshell manufacturer can provide reduced-recoil options for buckshot, birdshot, and slugs. If you are planning to shoot more than a couple of rounds per session, you might want to consider using low-recoil shells. They can make your experience much more pleasant, particularly when it comes to slugs and buckshot.

  • Go for Wearable Recoil Shields

These work pretty much in the same way as a recoil pad – but what makes them special is that you strap them to your shoulder or chest. Many people find these recoil-reducing tools quite convenient for long-range shooting or longer sessions. There are also those who dislike them because apparently, the shield gets in the way. It prevents them from mounting the gun as quickly as they want it.

Despite this fact, they are quite efficient in preventing a recoil injury from happening – but will also protect you if you already have an existent shoulder injury. This way, you will not add further shock to it, injuring yourself once more.

  • Be Careful with the Trigger

If your gun has a heavy trigger, then it will certainly add to the gun recoil. Instead, if you go for a crisp and relatively light trigger, things will be much easier to set off – therefore, making the whole shooting experience less unpleasant.

That being said, don’t even think about diddling with the gun’s trigger and trying to change it yourself. Not only is it dangerous, but the National Firearms Act may not allow you to make certain types of modifications without authorization.

  • Go for 20-Gauge

If you want to reduce the risk of recoil-related injury, then most people suggest that you use a 20-gauge gun instead of a 12-gauge option. These types of guns are relatively bigger in comparison to their 12-gauge counterparts – and while it might seem like a smart idea to get a smaller gun for lesser recoil, it is actually the opposite.

If the gun is lightweight, it will not have that much stability. Instead, a heavier gun will be held down by its own weight – therefore, reducing the recoil. A 9lbs gun is slightly more difficult to carry around (if you do not like the weight). Still, it will typically result in less recoil. Plus, it may be heavier, but many hunters say that these guns are very fun to shoot.

  • Wear Equipment

The last and perhaps one of the most efficient ways to reduce injuries caused by recoil is to wear the proper equipment. Goggles and gloves are recommended – but in most cases, the gloves are more than sufficient. Go for some snug, yet thin-fitting leather gloves, as they will reduce the amount of shock your hands receive. Make sure that the gloves aren’t too thick, as this can affect your aim when you are pulling the trigger.

Final Thoughts

Recoil is never fun – but there are some ways in which you can protect yourself. Sometimes, it is all a matter of accessories that you have around you. Other times, you might just need to change the gun or the ammo. Whatever option you choose, these small changes or additions will make your hunting/shooting experience much pleasant.

Why The World Is Getting Better And Why Hardly Anyone Knows It

Leave a comment

Why Don’t We Know The World Is Getting Better?

It’s ironic that in a world where knowledge and education are improving dramatically, there is widespread abysmal ignorance about the improving state of the world. “More than 9 out of 10 people do not think that the world is getting better.”

Our World In Data suggests that the media are partly to blame. The media does not tell us how the world is changing, it tells us where the world is going wrong. It tends to focus on single events particularly single events that have gone bad. By contrast, positive developments happen slowly with no particular event to promote in a headline. “More people are healthy today than yesterday,” just doesn’t cut it.

The result is that most people are ignorant about how the state of the world has changed. In both the U.K. and the U.S. most people think that “the share of people living in extreme poverty has increased! Two thirds in the US even think the share in extreme poverty has ‘almost doubled’.”

Steve Denning

https://www.quora.com/q/the-world-in-color/The-truth-about-progress-the-world-is-getting-much-much-better-But-nobody-seems-to-notice-it

https://www.forbes.com/sites/stevedenning/2017/11/30/why-the-world-is-getting-better-why-hardly-anyone-knows-it/

Gamechanger for Shooting

2 Comments

Gamechanger: Shooting’s star on the rise but it needs fanbase to survive

With competitive sport in limbo, it’s an opportunity for those in charge to re-think how their sports could change

You have to take your sport to the people rather than expecting people to come to your sport. The way to do that is through newer ideas. Evolve formats, evolve the way shooting is showcased.

You have to look at sport keeping one principle in mind – to increase the fan base with an eye on non-fans. The current shooting fan base is made up of purists and they prefer the traditionalist form of the sport. But you have to ask yourself the hard question of whether the current fan base is going to be big enough to lead the sport into the next 10 to 20 years, into the next couple of decades. It has to be relevant to today’s youth.

I think there has to be a lot of involvement of people from outside the shooting community because you have to find a way to cater to the non-shooting fan and that can only happen when you take their point of view into consideration. Broadcasters also should be involved in discussions very early on because broadcasting in sport has certain principles and it’s the reason why certain sports are more successful than others.



https://www.espn.in/shooting/story/_/id/29460191/gamechanger-shooting-star-rise-needs-fanbase-survive

https://www.espn.in/shooting/story/_/id/29015791/three-refugees-one-olympic-shooting-champion-story-undying-hope

Equal Rights History

Leave a comment

To CBS Sunday Morning and Ken Burns,
I am a long-time fan of CBS Sunday Morning and Ken Burns. Given his typical thoroughness with history, I was surprised at an oversight in his “Baseball is a Mirror of our Country” piece that aired on your show.

“The first real progress in civil rights since the Civil War took place… on a baseball diamond…” The oversight here is that marksmanship programs started just after the Civil War to better train up to the capabilities rifled small arms offered provided equal opportunities for competitors decades before this.

The U.S. Army began the Excellence-in-Competition (EIC) program in 1884, first creating Distinguished Rifleman and then Distinguished Pistol Shot gold badges to award competitors finishing in the top ten percent at EIC events. Buffalo Soldiers were equal participants and noteworthy competitors.

Buffalo Soldier marksmanship badges

The first shooter to become Double Distinguished, earning both badges, was Cpt. Horace Wayman Bivins, earning the distinction in 1903. A member of the 10th Cavalry Regiment and decorated for valor for his actions at the Battle of Santiago de Cuba, accounts of his history “reads like fiction from the imagination of a pulp magazine writer” as one newspaper described him. The Army Reserve Postal Match has an event named in his honor.

CPT Horace Bivins

The EIC program was managed by the U.S. Army Department of Civilian Marksmanship and then the Civilian Marksmanship Program and has been an open competition for military and civilian shooters. It is the only sport mandated by federal law, per Public Law Title 36, U.S. Code § 40727.

This is history worthy of your attention. I’ve sent articles on the history of Captain Horace Wayman Bivins and the Army’s marksmanship Equal Opportunities.

https://armyreservemarksman.info/equal-opportunities/

https://armyreservemarksman.info/cpt-bivins/

https://www.archives.gov/publications/record/1998/03/buffalo-soldiers.html

https://www.dyingtotelltheirstories.com/home/2020/3/5/qtznpg8giquyff1bwnaldudl2lgl95

John M. Buol Jr.
SFC, USAR
USARCMP Public Affairs/Postal Match Program
https://www.usar.army.mil/ARM/

Why Dry Prevention is Essential for Gun Safes

Leave a comment

by Jay Chambers

As a gun owner, you already know that proper storage is key for both safety and longevity. Owning a gun safe not only prevents unwanted access to deadly firearms, but it can also keep your guns in tip top shape so that they last a very long time.

However, one of the most common questions about gun safes is regarding a dehumidifier, and whether you need one to keep moisture away from your most prized possessions.

Along with other proper cleaning and storage, in some cases, it may be necessary to use a dehumidifier in the room with your gun safe to keep moisture from cracking or rusting your guns.

Getting a Dehumidifier

If you live in a particularly moist region of the United States, it’s going to be highly critical that you place a dehumidifier in the same room as your gun safe. However, it’s important for most gun owners to do the same, no matter where you live.

The exposure to moisture may seem miniscule, but over time, water will slowly ruin your gun safe and everything in it, even if it doesn’t seem possible. Especially if your gun safe is in a dark, damp space, you’ll be giving mold and mildew a breeding ground for growth, which is a recipe for disaster when it comes to guns.

As your gun safe slowly gathers moisture, you may not notice it’s happening at all until it’s too late. It doesn’t matter how careful you are about tending to it or whether your gun safe is small, large, or moderately sized. And certainly, if you’re going to spend hundreds of dollars on the perfect safe for your firearms, you want to prevent that eventual aging as much as you can.

Throwing on the extra cost of dry prevention is well worth the price, and there are a couple of options from which you can choose. There are desiccant dehumidifiers and electric dehumidifiers.

Understanding your options will help you get a better idea of which to choose.

Desiccant Dehumidifiers

These humidifiers don’t have any electrical components. They come in many different sizes and shapes, but they all have one thing in common. They have special packets or containers full of absorbent materials.

This absorbent material is designed to attract moisture, much like a sponge, and hold it, so it stays away from everything else in close proximity. The type of absorbent material used is typically silica gel.

If you don’t want to have to use electricity or drill a hole in your safe, this is a great option. They also don’t require any replacement parts and you can find the perfect size for your safe.

This type of humidifier is more affordable than an electric dehumidifier, so it works well for those who don’t want to spend a ton of money, but as the absorbent material fills up, you’ll need to replace them completely.

Electric Dehumidifiers

Electric dehumidifiers are popular options. They are effective and long lasting, but they’re also more expensive. They work harder for longer, and are a better choice for people who live in humid climates and need more dry prevention measures.

These types of humidifiers use heat to remove moisture from the air. They have exposed heating elements that work to evaporate moisture, and can work in a larger area than a desiccant dehumidifier.

They can also prevent condensation because they create high temperatures and can attack excess moisture than smaller dehumidifiers might miss.

The one drawback to this type of dehumidifier is that if you want it to work from inside the safe itself, you’ll need to run the wire through a hole in the safe to a power source. That means drilling a hole in your safe.

If you can’t drill a hole or you don’t want to, you can get rechargeable battery operated varieties, or you can simply place the dehumidifier outside the safe, but in close proximity, so it will continue to work.

The Right Choice

Either option will work, but you have to decide which will work best for you. While they have the same end goal, they achieve it in different ways. However, the durability of your gun safe is of the utmost importance, so no matter which you choose, you need to choose one sooner rather than later.

If you can afford it and have a way to connect it, an electric dehumidifier will be much more effective. If you can’t spring for one right now, choose a desiccant dehumidifier for now and save up for something better.

There’s no reason to spend thousands of dollars on firearms and a gun safe to keep them, while continuing to neglect the problem that moisture causes over time.

Other Tips

Humidity is a problem for all gun owners, not just those who live in humid climates. However, there are a lot of factors to consider, like where the gun safe is stored, how humid it is, and how often you access it.

Fresh air can help prevent moisture, so if you open your gun safe more often, you may not need a large, expensive dehumidifier. You may be fine with something simple and inexpensive.

The same goes for people who live in particularly dry climates. While there are very few places that have 0% humidity, if you live in an area that doesn’t have much, you will also not have to purchase something big or expensive.

The Verdict

No matter where you live, moisture prevention is critical for keeping your guns safe and in good condition. Along with appropriate use and cleaning, storing them the right way will ensure that moisture doesn’t age them faster than it should.

I qualified EXPERT…. what does that mean?

Leave a comment

Learn what a military expert qualification does (and does not…) mean.

Other points:
Those “small” green “Ivan” E-type targets used by the Army are a meter tall and over 1.5 feet (19 inches) wide. A hit anywhere is full value. And the Army qualification course can be passed with a 43% miss rate. 23/40 (57% hits) is a passing score

Like the APFT, Alt C is no good at telling you how good you are but is remarkable in telling how bad you are.

USAR Marksmanship program did a breakdown showing these qualification targets next to competition targets:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lwD7-Dzz3RQ

Older Entries

%d bloggers like this: