Endurance Race: Safety and Participation

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About 2,500 Boston Marathon runners receive medical treatment

Boston Globe, April 16, 2018
https://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2018/04/16/marathon-runners-treated-for-injuries-wellesley/JhQbVspqLwJEy4XFKjvULI/story.html

The food, drinks, coffee, and roaring fire in the building’s front room took on a more serious purpose as more than 50 injured competitors streamed in, many suffering from symptoms of hypothermia.

“It’s just become this impromptu shelter for running refugees,” said associate pastor Ashley Murphy, who lives nearby and had already raided her pantry and linen closet for food, towels, and dry clothes.

More than 2,500 runners, including 25 elite athletes, received medical treatment, race organizers said. Eighty-one runners were taken to the hospital.

Given 29,978 runners registered for the 2018 Boston Marathon (and they had to pre-qualify to be accepted), this is more than a 8.3% casualty rate. Contrast this to the injury rates common at shooting or strength sport events, which are comparatively non-existant.

So why do endurance sports enjoy positive attention? The stats continue to show why non-shooting events receive attention while shooting events do not.
https://firearmusernetwork.com/tag/participation-rates/

29,978 runners registered for the 2018 Boston Marathon, supported by 9,500 volunteers, over 500,000 spectators, and $830,500 in prizes. There were another 10,000 participants at the BAA 5K around the Boston Common held just before.
The 2018 Boston Marathon: By The Numbers by Kurt Badenhausen, Forbes Magazine
https://www.forbes.com/sites/kurtbadenhausen/2018/04/16/the-boston-marathon-2018-by-the-numbers/#7ccf034b31d6

Contrast this to participation rates at shooting or strength sport events and you’ll have your answer.

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Improving Marksmanship Programs

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Words of wisdom from John Tate

  1. Get competition instilled at the unit level – then post level, etc. I put this first – because it is the most important factor. Getting leadership interested in crucial. Get awards and/or commendations for commanding officers of small units when their people shoot well. If the brass appears to care about something, their minions will too.
  2. Instill competition. Just like PT should be, consider every qual session to be competitive. Post scored and give some sort of prize/praise to the top shooters. Castigate those at the bottom.
  3. Promote self-training. Use on-duty time to show proper techniques (especially dry fire techniques), and have troops practice on their own time. Don’t soldiers work on PT on their own time? Also, don’t you still own boots 24/7? In my day (1960s, 1/2 a century ago) not only boots, but regulars were yours 24/7.
  4. Publish the comparative costs of shooting against other activities that require consumables … like jet fuel for aircraft, guided missiles, projectiles for armor and artillery. I think you can make the case that small arms ammo is cheap. And, if you can copy some of the laser simulation systems, you don’t even need ammo, no worry about lead poison, and no worry about negligent discharges.
  5. Consider a practice from WWI through the VietNam era: Use .22 LR and airguns.
  6. Use reduced size ranges & targets. For rifle, long ranges are hard to use. They take up lots of space and preparation/mainatenance. They require target pullers. They require time just walking back and forth from line to pits. Consider reduced range work. Putting bullets in the same hole at 1,000 inches equates to holding the 10-ring at 600 yds.

Hang Tough – Keep the Faith – Watch your 6.

John Correia on Training Standards

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John Correia
ASP (Active Self Protection)

It continues to boggle my mind that a small segment of the defensive training world insists that timers are useless in defensive firearms training.

Honestly, that’s like saying “Grades are useless in measuring student’s learning.” This showcases a gross misunderstanding of what grades ARE. They don’t measure. They acknowledge and demonstrate an objective standard of achievement, which can then be correlated into other areas to prepare a student to achieve “in the real world.”

It’s like looking at racing and saying, “Qualifying laps are bogus and don’t reflect how races will go, so get rid of them because they don’t help you in the race.” That’s not what qualifying laps are. Qualifying shows your raw ability with your equipment to see what your best is, so that you can be ranked with your peers as the race starts. It is an acknowledgment of your demonstrated maximum ability in ideal conditions, which tends to correlate to success on race day.

There IS a timer in your gunfight. There’s no beep, but there IS a timer. Make no mistake, I have seen gunfights won by a tenth and lost by a tenth.

No one is saying “if you’re X fast on the timer, you’ll win.” We’re saying, “This objective standard showcases a certain level of proficiency with this critical task which will give you maximum advantage in a defensive shooting.”

Failing to recognize that is…puzzling.

Instructors Can’t Give What They Don’t Have

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A firearms instructor that can’t shoot well, isn’t

Nemo dat quod non habet (“no one gives what he doesn’t have”)

Training classes are NOT, I repeat NOT making you a better shooter….GASP, what did he say? | masf.co

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http://masf.co/2016/07/17/training-classes-are-not-i-repeat-not-making-you-a-better-shooter-gasp-what-did-he-say/

Camp Perry Open’s ‘Super Final’ event unlike any other

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http://www.portclintonnewsherald.com/story/news/local/2018/01/14/camp-perry-opens-super-final-event-unlike-any-other/1032138001/

Lies of Gurus

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What happens when a skilled competitor used to achieving measurable results in organized competition is held up against widely-accepted tactical gurus that aren’t normally tested?


Kiai Master (black karategi with red belt) offers a 5,000 dollar challenge that he can beat any MMA competitor.


MMA competitor Xu Xiaodong (black shirt and shorts) demonstrates his competition approach a "thunder style" martial arts master.

https://mobile.nytimes.com/2017/05/10/world/asia/mma-martial-arts-china-tai-chi.html?referer=android-app://m.facebook.com

Interesting, Xu Xiaodong (the MMA competitor in the second video decisively winning this challenge against the “thunder style” martial arts master) has been lambasted for his victory because it “violates the morals of martial arts.”

Based on observing and participating in the range activity of tens of thousands of military personnel and comparing that to the range activity (training and competition) of competition shooters over the decades, there are direct parallels.

What the gamer does is not real, even though he actually does it.
What the tactician does is real, even though he likely has never done it.

And should the gamer beat the tactician (who allegedly operates where there are no rules) it’s an “outrage” for “violating morals.”

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