Training Scars: Brass in Pockets

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The “found brass in pockets story” is a popular old saw offered as a warning against developing bad habits or training scars. The story goes that some police officer was found dead with spent brass in his pockets. Being of the era when revolvers were common, the doomed-but-nameless officer unintentionally stuffed his brass into pockets while reloading during a protracted, long-ago fight, thus slowing him down and sealing his fate. Details are rarely offered, but the boogeyman to avoid is unintentionally developing a bad habit and to only do things exactly as told or you’ll suffer the same fate! Boo!
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What’s Wrong with Defensive Shooting Classes

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Alright, sometimes we have close calls, but this one had to have bit the bullet, literally. I can’t believe I was so close to it also. Could have been bad for a lot of people. Even though everyone is okay here. It’s just a reminder to train and be fully aware of how you operate a handgun.

We were at a dynamic drill day practicing self defense with a focus on moving with a group of shooters.

This video nicely sums up nearly everything wrong with defensive shooting classes. A line dance of lower skilled shooters dumping a bunch of rounds semi-discriminately at large, close targets. Note they’re all circling through a batch of targets shot at by everyone. No attempt to see where (or if) they’re hitting, and with everyone shooting the same batch of targets we can’t anyway. No time or other pressure. And a dude (who probably is convinced competitive shooting causes bad habits) nearly shoots himself before slopping through the exercise.

This is poor gunhandling displayed by a novice. Blaming the holster ignores the true problem.

Line dances like this can’t get people more skilled. Despite false promises and outright lies, everyone needs to earn their chops on simple but stringent drills even if nobody seems to want to.

Simple range exercises and competitive events are disregarded as not useful or relevant. Some people, including those hosting such classes, claim they cause bad habits, training scars, and the like. Using a scored and/or timed fixed exercise is claimed as not useful, even meaningless, and to be avoided.

Nobody wants to earn their fundamental skills doing boring, static, range drills and other “circus tricks.” We want dynamic drill day practicing relevant, real-world self defense in context with a focus on moving. Just like this guy.

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