Archerytopic.com: 10 Items You Should Have In Your Deer Hunting Pack

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Robert Gate at Archerytopic.com submitted the following article. Enjoy!

Deer hunting can be fun or a nightmare at some point depending on what you have carried in your hunting pack. It is always important that you get to pick the essential tools that will make your hunting easier. Many people will have different things on their lists, below are some of the important items you should never miss the next time you go out hunting for deer.

1. Scents and Lures

Scents and Lures

Today, various options exist when it comes to deer attractant. These are the items that will support you in attracting the deer to your position. Such can include having a deer decoy and scents that would make the deer think their fellow mates are in your position. Without a doubt, you should now be ready to take your shot when the deer end up in your staged location with scents and lures.

Having deer calls could be another great addition to your lures. Make sure that you practice using the call before applying it in the real world. The worst can be when you use the call and end up with the wrong tone.

2. Power Bank or Battery Pack

Power Bank or Battery Pac

Having a battery pack is important to help you recharge your phone or any other application that might need power while outdoors with no access to a power outlet. A charged phone could come in handy in a place where you are lost and need help.

3. Extra Clothes

Extra Clothes

Even it is hunting in the wild, you still want to have a change of clothes, especially if you are going to be out there for a few days. Well, you do not have to pack as if you were traveling. Just get the necessary clothes as you might not have to change daily. Do not over-pack, as it might make your luggage heavy all for nothing.

4. Flashlight and Matches

Flashlight and Matches

It does not matter which you choose, but just make sure that you have light especially when it gets dark. It can be quite tough to hunt at night if you do not have enough illumination. You could still use the fire for keeping yourself warm during the chilly nights other than help with visibility. Just be sure that at the camp they allow for lighting the fire. The flashlight, on the other hand, should help you get back to the campsite if it gets dark while hunting.

5. Water and Energy Bars

Water and Energy Bars

You have to keep yourself refreshed so that you get to stay in focus while outdoors hunting for deer. The water is important for hydration so that you can maintain focus. The energy bars should help give you more energy for hunting before you can get access to food later on after your hunting trip.

6. Compass and Updated Map

Compass and Updated Map

Having a proper sense of direction is always important to make sure that you end up at the right place all the time. It is the reason you must have a compass and an updated map for you to use. The compass can also help you in finding your deer after shooting it. If you shoot it in your stand, make sure to note the direction of your compass before descending.

7. Hunting Knife

Hunting Knife

The knife does not have to be always used on the deer. Sometimes you get into scenarios where having a knife could come in handy. So make sure to get one for yourself for the next hunting trip.

8. License

License

Having your hunting license is always important. You do not want to get in trouble with the authorities when asked about your license and permit. Always have it in your hunting pack at all times.

9. Binoculars and Rangefinder

Binoculars and Rangefinder

It can be binocular or monocular, you simply have to choose what works for you in terms of usability features. The binoculars and rangefinder are important to help you assess just how far you are from your target and also spot them at a distance. Miss them and you will wish you had carried one with you before going to hunt.

10. Gloves

Gloves

You should not leave home without the gloves. They are not only important for keeping you warm, but also great for protection. You can never know what you get to touch while outdoors in the wild. The gloves can also be great to use with a scent killer to keep your scent to a minimum.

At least you now have an idea about the top 10 items you can never miss in your deer hunting pack. You could always add more to your list depending on your needs as a person. If you have the right items, then your hunting trip will have fewer issues of inconveniences, and you should get hunting done effectively.

Robert Gate is the founder of Archerytopic.com. He was enthusiastic about hunting from the first shot, from then he decided to become a pro hunter. If you find something helpful on his blog, he would be proud to hear from you.

PDF version:
10 Items You Should Have In Your Deer Hunting Pack

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Historical Handgun: Shooting To Live-Fairbairn & Sykes

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Karl Rehn at KR Training has developed Historical Handgun, a course that presents the history of handgun skills and drills throughout the years paired with the guns most commonly associated with that particular era.

In developing his coursework, he reviewed the 1942 book Shooting To Live by W.E. Fairbairn and E.A. Sykes.

http://blog.krtraining.com/book-review-historical-handgun-shooting-to-live-1942-fairbairn-sykes/

Important points:

  • Point shooting approaches advocate for some initial target work. Applegate recommended the same as well.
  • A primary reason these approaches took hold is mostly due to equipment limitations of the day coupled with misunderstanding on how to make it better.
  • As trainer Tom Givens points out in his instructor training courses, the duty and carry pistols of that time had tiny, hard to see sights, compared to the higher visibility sights that became common in the 1970s and beyond. Similarly, the amount of light, and reliability, of flashlights of that era were significantly less than what became available in the 70s and later years.

Aristotle on Courage

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“Courage is observance of the mean with regard to things that excite confidence or fear, choosing a course and sticking to the post because it is noble to do so or because it is disgraceful not to.”

– Aristotle

The Tape Test

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The following article is based on material by Nick Barringer, PhD.

Nothing ruins a good combat story like a reliable eye witness. Nothing ruins a mostly anecdotal argument like actual science.

Military personnel sometimes complain about the tape test, which is a measure of body composition to assess a person’s lean mass and body fat. The basis of this requirement is spelled out in Department of Defense Instruction Number 1308.3 DoD Physical Fitness and Body Fat Programs Procedures

It is DoD policy that service members shall maintain physical readiness through appropriate nutrition, health, and fitness habits. Maintaining desirable body composition is an integral part of physical fitness, general health, and military appearance. Physical fitness is an important component of the general health of the individual. Comprehensive fitness includes many aspects of a healthy lifestyle.

Physical Fitness Tests assess Service-wide baseline generalized fitness levels and are not intended to represent mission or occupationally specific fitness demands.

Ensure that gender-appropriate body fat standards shall not be more stringent than 18 percent for men and 26 percent for women, and shall not be more liberal than 26 percent for men and 36 percent for women, as measured using circumference-based methods.

In 1981 the Services were directed to develop body composition standards with the three major concerns being: 1) body composition was an integral part of physical fitness 2) body composition is a determinant of appropriate military appearance and 3) body composition is a determinant of general health and well-being of military personnel.

In 1982, in response to the directive developed the following criteria:
a) no skinfold measurements
b) emphasizes circumference measurements at easily locatable anatomic sites
c) not to exceed 4 measurements(excluding height and weight)
d) able to be executed by non-technically trained personnel
e) does not require elaborate or unavailable equipment
f) common equation for all race/ethnic groups
g) measurements should be avoided that require undressing beyond the Army sport ensemble
h) selected equations must have a correlation coefficient of at least 0.80 with hydrostatically determined percent body fat, and a standard error of the estimate not greater than 4.0 % body fat
i) equations should give comparable results in the three major race/ethnic groups

Based on these criteria, a study was carried out at Fort Hood, TX and Carlisle Barracks, PA on 1,194 males and 319 females between 25 Jun and 1 Nov 1984. The Soldiers were hydrostatically weighed and circumference measurements were taken. Based on this study, the Army circumference formula for the tape test was built. When the body fat estimates from the tape test were compared to the “gold standard” of hydrostatic weighing the values provide were an R=0.817 with Standard Error of 4 for men and an R=0.820 and a Standard Error of 3.5 for women. The assessment was also cross-validated in a population of Navy personnel.

In statistics you have the R or correlation coefficient which tells you how well one test correlates to the other with 0 being no correlation and 1 being a perfect correlation. The only way you get 1 is when comparing something to itself so anything 0.80 and above is considered a strong correlation. These tests were 0.81-0.82.

For perspective, the correlation coefficient for asbestos exposure and cancer, particularly mesothelioma, is reported around 0.80, a slightly lower correlation.

Aren’t there better alternatives? In a 2013 Army Times article (“Experts: Tape test has huge margin of error”) they used hydrostatic weighing on 10 Soldiers. The irony is using ten subjects completing hydrostatic weighing in a non-research setting to claim flaws with a test that was developed using hydrostatic weighing of 1,513 Soldiers in a research setting and then
cross-validated using additional Navy personnel, and revalidated by more advanced methods such as Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry.

All body composition assessments are estimates. The only way to directly measure body fat is to dissect a cadaver, cut out all the fat, and weigh it. Every assessment has its flaws.
For hydrostatic weighing, if you drink a bunch of fluid or just ate a large meal, you would be denser and therefore the extra weight would be interpreted as lean mass and a lower body fat percentage. That is why how the test was administered makes a difference. In a research setting, such as the one used to develop the tape test, the researchers control for things like subject hydration status etc. In the 10 subjects the Army Times assessed we don’t know if these things were taken into account.

Bioelectrical Impedance (BIA), as seen on some types of bathroom scales, estimates body fat based on body water. So hydration status and the quality of the machine can significantly impact the estimate. Skin-fold calipers requires a trained professional with knowledge of the appropriate anatomical sites and technique. The Army used skin-fold calipers in the past but found the tape test to have less variability, be more efficient, and according to Dr.Friedl better serve the Soldier trying to lose weight since intraabdominal fat seems to mobilize more quickly than subcutaneous fat as he reported “waist circumference based military equations are relatively sensitive to changes in criterion-measured body fat for male and female soldiers during basic training and male soldiers during Ranger training”.

The tape test acknowledges that height/weight fails to take body composition into account and was designed to determine if a Soldier is over-fat. It was designed to be an efficient and economical assessment that could be completed by non-technically trained personnel. It was designed to have a strong correlation to recognized “gold standards” in body composition assessment and work for all major ethnicities. Even in the Army Times report from 2013, they did not report that any of the 10 Soldiers failed the tape test that shouldn’t have. So the tape test still did its job. When one takes the original daunting requirements into consideration, actually reads the level of research that went into developing the tape test, and compares it to the fiscal and time costs of other body composition assessments, a tape test is the only sensible answer.

It could be argued a Waist-Hip Ratio is a better assessment as it has been correlated to mortality in formal studies. A simple waist measurement, as used by the Air Force, is simpler still and accomplishes much of the same thing. Regardless, we’d still be using a tape test. Nobody that is actually lean and has appropriate body composition will fail a tape test. If the tape is giving a result you don’t like, fix the cause instead of blaming the test.

For more information on the background of body composition assessments in the military, go to Google Scholar and enter the names of Dr. J.A. Hodgdon, Dr. J.A. Vogel, and Dr. K.E. Freidl. For the cliff notes read Dr. Freidl’s review
http://hprc-online.org/physical-fitness/files/JSCRS87BodyComposition.pdf

Read more:

The Tape Test: It is more sensible than you think!

I’m a Responsible Gun Owner? Seriously?

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The description given in the article below is not uncommon and it often applies to military, law enforcement, and hunters as well.

While living in San Antonio, I was a TCOLE (formerly TCLEOSE) certified instructor and worked part-time at the Alamo Area Regional Law Enforcement Academy. As a Texas resident, I took the TxDPS – License to Carry course described below. While living in Wisconsin, I was certified by the state Department of Natural Resources as a Wisconsin Hunter Education instructor and taught classes. I’ve been in the U.S. Army in various capacities for a quarter century and with the US Army Reserve Marksmanship Training and Competitive Program since 2004.

I’ve been fortunate to have been involved with many skilled people in all of these experiences but that was largely due to my seeking them out and knowing what to look for. I already had higher-level shooting experience via organized competition and held Classifications from national-level organizations before doing any of this. The then-director of the DNR Hunter’s Ed program attended HunterShooter events I held. I applied for that Academy after having a fellow Shooting Team member speak well of the training director and his program. My Texas LTC course was taught by a fellow instructor and USAR Shooting Team member. I specifically took the class from him to avoid the clown show described below.

Gun owners are often their own worst enemy. The level of incompetence described here is not uncommon. Military, law enforcement, hunters, and concealed carry people are often at novice levels. Mandatory qualification levels are only useful if they’re difficult enough to assess useful skill. That means people incapable of displaying minimal useful skill must be failed. The other approach is for the program to intend to pass everyone. This means standards are adjusted down until everyone can. This article describes the results of that.
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Tactical Theater

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However, the worst training scar, bad habit, and “please don’t do this in a fight for a life” is the “unload” – “show clear” – “hammer down” – “holster”…Ugh! I have seen it countless times in shoot houses, SWAT ranges, military training, federal law enforcement and training classes. For example, they will engage a target or two and mid run will drop the magazine, lock the slide to the rear, then realize what they have done and reload the firearm and continue.

This “training scar” only occurs during poorly-designed exercises or with novice shooters. I believe the author has seen it because what he describes is known to combine poorly-designed exercises with novice shooters, though by “countless times” he really means “more than once.” It is popularly and falsely attributed to competitive shooting even though there is no evidence competitors are prone to doing it.
https://firearmusernetwork.com/myth-of-competition-training-scars/

This claimed “Unload/Show Clear scar” is an artifact of tactical theater, where trainees are told to act in a prescribed manner contradictory to what’s actually happening.

The theater script says for everyone on the line to engage a paper target in a fixed exercise on line with others doing the same, then conduct a “threat scan” (menacing scowl optional) to look for something we already know isn’t really there while pretending we might still have to engage something else, even though we really know the exercise is complete.

So, somebody failed their acting script and dropped their mag after the obvious exercise was obviously complete and didn’t perform a head wag in the school-prescribed manner… A ha! Training scar! Bad habit! Gunna gethca killt in da streetz!

I’m certain this bit of logic won’t change the minds of people that insist on imagining this imaginary problem exists. Test it for yourself.

Set up a course that doesn’t have a definite end point, where participants genuinely don’t know if, when, where, what, or how much they’re supposed to shoot. This can be arranged as force-on-force (if you have the logistics to do it right), a shoot house, surprise course, etc. The important point is to not have a predetermined end.

If there is no training scar, participants won’t run a scripted After Shooting Scan (or whatever you call it) because they’re actually looking for things that might really be there instead of acting out a scripted head wag. There won’t be a UL/SC if the situation isn’t obviously in hand. On the other hand, if someone robotically goes into UL/SC without being prompted and before the scenario is complete, you can claim a problem. But only if that happens during a properly set-up scenario.

Running surprise courses where shooters genuinely don’t know how many or where targets are in advance, where the actor isn’t required to act out a tactical theater script, will reveal if there’s a real UL/SC problem. With the exception of lower-skilled people, I doubt it will.

Combat Readiness

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Members of the U.S. Army Reserve Competitive Marksmanship Program discuss their combat experiences and how competition shooting helps with military training and readiness.


SSG Bonjour

MAJ Garcia

SSG Porter

SSG Rosene

MAJ Rosnick

MAJ Sleem

SSG Fuentes

SGM Gerner

SGT Hall

SSG Hartley

Drill Sergeant Willis

CPT Freeman

SSG Kizanis

SSG Volmer


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