Best Tacticool Shooting Review Ever

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Of course, it was done by Ozzy Man Reviews. Even an Australian satirist with no formal firearms training can easily see how this kind of crap is stupid.

https://www.facebook.com/ozzymanreviews/videos/1778497972186062/

“He’s not hitting any of the targets… but that’s ok, you don’t always have to kill everyone. He’s causing alot of… discomfort in the combat zone.”

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Free Hunter Education Course

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https://nra.yourlearningportal.com/courses/hunter-education

This NRA Online Hunter Education course is designed to help new hunters of all ages learn how to be safe and responsible members of the hunting community. From the organization that built the first-ever hunter education program in 1949, this state-of-the-art course is the most comprehensive online hunter education instruction in the United States…and it’s 100% FREE

From John Tate:
In 1949, the NRA introduced the first Hunter Safety Course. Over time, it has grown in scope; but the central theme remains safe handling and use of firearms.

Now, exploiting electronic connectivity, this course is available for FREE over the internet. Of the four options, each may have some state-specific content; but the essentials of firearm safety are universal so any course will do.

Frank Proctor On Guns, Gear, Training, And Competitive Shooting

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Folks, here are some of my thoughts in regards to guns, gear, manipulations, technique, etc. I’m a fan of gear that works better as long as it’s reliable. I don’t take anything to a match that I wouldn’t take to combat. I would and have set up my guns for combat the same as my competition guns. In the ratio of performance and reliability I find a good happy medium. Mine work better than stock and they always work, they have to. The same goes for any techniques or shooting methodology it must for combat or competition. There is a bunch of weak sauce out there in the statements that competition stuff will get you killed. I disagree, I was a Green Beret and deployed to Afghanistan and Iraq both before and after I got involved in competitive shooting and achieved the rank of Grand Master in USPSA (limited division).

In May 2007 I was the Primary Instructor for Combat Marksmanship for an entire Special Forces Group and trained with dudes from other SF groups and other DOD agencies. I shot my first pistol match in May 2007 and I found out there was a whole lot I didn’t know about shooting. It was very humbling to see what those competitive shooters could do with a pistol. I was not as good as they were and I wanted to be better than I was. I’m still not as good as I want to be. I worked on it and trained and competed as often as I could. I learned a lot from shooting with those guys and competing and being under that kind of stress. I did and still do take away may lessons that make me a better shooter and made me a better Green Beret. Outside of more efficient techniques, gear and manipulations( the stuff that most shooters incorrectly focus on) a HUGE take away is seeing faster and more aggressively. What you see and process and how fast and aggressive you can do it make the biggest difference. An easy translation of me was doing CQB after competing. I am much more aggressive with my vision as a result of competing and it pays huge dividends being able to receive visual information and process it faster. I encourage every person that carries a gun of a living or for self defense to go out an compete, find out if you are a stood at shooting under stress as you want to be. If you are as good as you want to be then quit competing. I wasn’t and am still not as good as I want to be. Also worth mentioning, I find it very easy to separate tactics and shooting.

The visual and mechanical efficiency that you will gain by becoming a successful competitive shooter will make the application of tactics easier when that time arrives. Here’s another factoid and probably will be painful. There are a lot of people that carry guns for a living or in self defense that don’t train to be better shooters or very rarely do so ( my hat is off the the dedicated exceptions, I respect your dedication to your trade and responsibility) On the other every competitive shooters trains to become better because they want to win or they wan to be better than they were yesterday. In my mind that should apply to also apply to the folks that carry guns with the possibility of having to use it in a life or death situation.

Now, let me talk about press checks and putting rifles on safe etc. When I attended the Special Forces Advanced Urban Combat Course (Shooting and CQB course for every Green Beret) It was taught as part of a deliberate load procedure to press check the gun to insure a round was in the chamber. I think that’s a pretty solid PCI (pre combat inspection) I do it and the dudes I went to war with do it. It doesn’t cost anything and I have real good warm fuzzy when I need the gun it’ll go boom. I’ve seen a bunch of dudes that don’t do it and I’ve also seen them step up to shoot with an unloaded gun. I’ve seen this a bunch with the non press checkers. Never seen it with a though that make the press check part of their gun handling habits. I press check my pistol usually after I shoot, this became a habit for me as an adaptation. I shot a Beretta a good bit and with big hands I would override the slide stop and not get slide lock. I started press checking the pistol and prevented that uncomfortable feeling of having an empty mag and empty chamber.

Now, let’s talk about something else that seems to get some “tactical” shooters fired up. Putting the rifle on safe during reloads and when transitioning from rifle to pistol. I live by a very simple rule in regards to safe manipulation of the rifle. If my eyes are not connected to the sights the rifle is on safe. To this date that method has not cost me anytime in an engagement or transition. Over the last 15 years I have had and AR-15 or M4 in my hands nearly everyday. It’s a habit and an easy one. Doesn’t cost any time and prevents any issues. Once again I do it and believe in it an so do my peers. If you aren’t into it that’s cool, but not if you are on a range with me. I think anyone with an open mind would agree. I also believe that if you carry an AR-15 or M4 for a living and putting he gun on safe is an issue for you, then you should train more to make it easy and I’ll be glad to help with that. If you think that putting the rifle on safe when you are not connected to the sights is silly, then I think you need to evaluate what happens on the pointy end of the rifle. It’s only a matter of time and exposure before people with unsafe gun handling skills have their life or someone else’s life changed in a negative way.

Well, that’s about all I have for now I’ll finish by saying I believe win everything I do and teach and I know it works because I have down it and seen it with my eyes and explored it. Not because someone said so or the book said or the forum said etc. Also for a recap on my opinions based on my experiences as a shooter both combat shooting and competition shooting. Shooting has been a part of my everyday life and a passion for the last 15 years. I’ve been a Green Beret since November 2003 and Grand Master Since January 2009. Thanks for reading and I hope to see y’all at a range someday and I wish you the best in your shooting!

-Frank Proctor

Machine Gun Training

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EVERY 0331 that goes through AMGC does high angle fire. Slow news day?

– Joe R Heft

A variety of gunnery skills are taught during USMC Advanced Machine Gunner Course but most Army personnel remain oblivious to gunnery with machine guns and are rarely competent with them beyond loading and minimal marksmanship on easy and well-defined point targets.

In fact, most Army personnel have been conducting machine gun qualification incorrectly and failing to achieve published standards. Consider this from the new small arms training manual:

TC 3-20.40
7-119

Table IV-B requires gunners to practice trigger control and requires the firer to fire one five to seven round burst at each specified point target or series of targets in the area target sequences. Gunners are authorized to fire only one five to seven round burst at each paster. [Emphasis added]

The authors explicitly spell this out due to recognizing most Army personnel have failed to perform at this standard but it is NOT a new/different standard. This is not a change to doctrine or a new qualification, this is the way the qual was always supposed to be run. Simple arithmetic of the number of rounds issued during qualification, the number of rounds per burst to be fired, and the number of target areas engaged confirms this. The explicit instruction was forced in due to a large number of Army personnel that don’t math good.

Lack of skill with this equipment is unfortunately common.
MG-backwards
backwards-load-MG

Operation Cold Steel has been less than stellar…

Such “expertise” is rampant:

army handgun pew

Marines practice rarely trained machine gun tactic that could take out Russian vehicles

The Marine Corps is in Bulgaria practicing high-angle fire with a 40 mm grenade launching machine gun known as the Mk-19… The tactic could be beneficial in striking down infantry troops behind walls or protection, or taking out advancing Russian armor and light-skinned vehicles.

With seamless communications and competent forward observers, high-angle Mk-19 fire could also be used to rapidly and easily walk rounds onto an enemy target, according to several machine gunners.

It’s a skill set learned at the Marine Corps’ six-week Advanced Machine Gunner Course.

More:
https://www.marinecorpstimes.com/news/your-marine-corps/2018/07/18/marines-practice-rarely-trained-machine-gun-tactic-to-prepare-for-a-fight-with-russia/

https://firearmusernetwork.com/soldiers-take-aim-and-miss/

https://firearmusernetwork.com/machine-gun-gunnery-commonwealth-militaries/

https://firearmusernetwork.com/death-of-machine-gun-gunnery/

https://firearmusernetwork.com/comparing-small-arms-training-wwii-today/

https://firearmusernetwork.com/suppressive-fire-cyclic-rates/
https://firearmusernetwork.com/suppressive-fire-myth-fact/

https://firearmusernetwork.com/automatic-rifles-should-the-m249-be-replaced/

https://firearmusernetwork.com/the-emma-gees-by-herbert-mcbride-part-1/

Memes Don’t Matter

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Words of wisdom from a skilled firearms instructor.

I’m overwhelmed by all my gun-owning friends posting statistics, facts, and memes to convince the gun grabbers that they are wrong.

Here’s something to consider. Emotional arguments are rarely successfully countered by facts and statistics. The facts are very clear in this case. Do you think that re-stating them endlessly on Facebook is likely to change someone’s mind? I don’t.

Can you think of a single occasion where you have had a major change of opinion after reading a Facebook post or meme? I can’t.

You aren’t going to change a stranger’s worldview by posting more on the internet. Instead, focus your efforts on making positive changes through personal contact with the people who are close to you and who already respect you as a person. Don’t waste your time arguing with strangers on social media.

Instead of posting on Facebook, I taught 27 students how to be safer shooters, more formidable fighters, and better tacticians this weekend. Each of those students will undoubtedly use some of the skills I shared to make their own tribes more robust and resilient.

In the long term, those small, personal changes are the fuel for positive societal evolution. CNN soundbites and Facebook memes are merely annoying background noise.

Do work that matters.

Forbes Journalist Investigates Firearm Industry

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Forbes contributor Elizabeth MacBride spent six months specializing in the firearms industry, investigating and then summing up what she learned.

Takeaway: The most important influencing factor towards positive coverage of shooters, gun owners, and firearms is a consistent, open dialogue that showcases safe and skillful use, humanizes firearm users, and is inviting to everyone. Much more than political rhetoric, turning positive usage into a story and then consistently telling people about it is the best path forward.

Often, the problem is that negligent and criminal misuse is more sensational and easier to report. This is not the media’s fault as it falls inline with human nature. Skilled firearm users are rare compared to casual gun owners and not vocal enough to maintain a consistent voice.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/elizabethmacbride/2018/06/30/there-is-no-such-thing-as-a-gun-and-8-other-lessons-from-the-gun-business-beat/

I started covering the business of guns in part because the decline of high-quality print journalism in the past two decades means nuance is being lost. I believe nuance is crucial to sustain a pluralistic society, here and abroad. That’s part of the reason I covered the Middle East for three years; we all suffer from many Americans’ inability to see that region without prejudice.

And business, which tends to be a reasonably neutral and thankfully numbers-based lens through which to write, is a good platform for exploring topics on which there are many points of view.

Here are some of the things I’ve learned in my first six months.

1. Most of the gun community is open to fair-minded coverage.

2. The world of gun businesses is far more nuanced than I imagined, and in different ways that I imagined.

3. Marketing, politics and business are almost inseparable.

4. There are no good numbers.

5. It’s a business with a declining customer base.

6. Many more people like guns than I realized.

7. The West is different. Gun owners and gun businesses out West see guns as tools, one element of a practical, inherently nuanced way of existing in the world.

8. Violence marketing is more powerful than we realize.

9. There is no such thing as a gun. The technology has evolved faster than the language, so much so that we have reverted to broader words

Rooney Guns FTW!

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I am old enough to remember when USPSA started creating different equipment divisions. In fact, my first serious attempt at competition shooting was in their Limited division soon after it was first adopted.

The open/unlimited “race gun” had become the runaway favorite for serious competitors and they deviate from a “normal” carry/service pistol. This led to detractors deriding the development as “rooney guns” as something simply unsuitable for street and service use.
https://firearmusernetwork.com/tag/rooney-gun/

Now, don’t tell anyone, but equipment divisions are far less important than most people realize, especially those complaining about them:
https://firearmusernetwork.com/race-guns-vs-regular-guns/
https://firearmusernetwork.com/skill-classification-works/

Houston PD: Pistol Red Dot Sights Approved For Duty Use

In what may be the largest adoption of red dot sights on pistols to date, the Houston Police Department has issued a letter to sworn officers approving the optics for duty use. The approval comes along with some common-sense caveats; a Safariland level III Holster must be used, optics-ready pistols from specified manufacturers and the completion of an eight hour training course prior to putting the RDS into service.

The move towards the use of micro red dot sights by military and law enforcement has been gaining steam in the past few years with special teams and units being allowed to field the technology on a more case-by-case process. With more than 5,000 officers on staff Houston PD is set to take the lead on electronic sight use in U.S. law enforcement.

More:
https://www.thefirearmblog.com/blog/2018/07/05/houston-red-dot-sights/

This is not a new development, just a police department formally authorizing their use:
https://firearmusernetwork.com/competition-shooting-ftw/

This part is most important:

The resulting data from required qualifications (scores using a red dot versus irons), fielding (models, mechanical/electronic failures) battery life and other variables will be important to law enforcement and civilian shooters alike. Real-world field testing is invaluable when it comes to picking the best guns, sights, holsters and related gear. Let’s hope that Houston PD is willing to share sanitized data.

Here’s the sad downer. The Department of Army first adopted general-issue optics in the mid-1990s and retained the same qualification procedures and course since 2018. Qualification scores have not changed. As always, it’s the indian, not the arrow.

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