MSG Norman Anderson inducted into the Army Marksmanship Unit Hall of Fame

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Congrats to MSG Norman Anderson on his induction into the Army Marksmanship Unit Hall of Fame.

I’d have to look back in my data books over the past 6 years to see how many 200s he’s coached me into at the 600 yard line, but it is enough that I have lost count. He’s coached me into a 499 and 497 during important team matches, leading to me getting 4 different trophies from the National Matches.

Great job, Coach!

- SGT Kris Friend

Truth

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All truth passes through three stages.
First, it is ridiculed.
Second, it is violently opposed.
Third, it is accepted as self-evident.

- Arthur Schopenhauer

The Triple Nickel Course of Fire

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The Triple Nickel Course of Fire

DESCRIPTION:

The Triple-Nickel course is used to measure a shooter’s proficiency level and ability to consistently PERFORM ON DEMAND! Through thorough application of fundamentals of marksmanship and weapon handling, this advanced firearm drill evaluates the capacity to save your own life, against multiple assailants, in a short amount of time. The shooter must consistently demonstrate proficiency by maintaining 100% accuracy in the 5 second time allotment; just like in real life…there is no award for losing. This course is shot with a minimum of:
a. A cover garment and a holster one would utilize either on, or off duty.
b. As a Uniformed Officer using the Agency approved duty belt with “double or triple retention” holster, and assigned pistol.

*A minimum of 3 successful attempts (not consecutive) must be accomplished in order to be awarded the coveted “Triple-Nickel” coin. The shooter must complete this task on the day, of the first successful attempt. *

SAFETY PRECAUTIONS:

a. Normal range safety rules apply.
b. Shooters must be efficient in their movements, and cognizant of the barrel direction (laser rule).
c. Shooters must utilize a standard safe holster, and magazine pouch. This holster must me worn as designed. All retention devices engaged.

SCORING:

Number of rounds on each target are 2, for a total of 10 rounds. The scoreable area is the 4/5 ring area on the Tran Star-II or the outer bottle for the QIT target. Unlike most courses of fire, the benefit DOES NOT go to the shooter; liners are considered misses regardless of which side they are located. When scoring this course, if there becomes any doubt on a shot placement, it shall be considered a miss. No questions asked.

SCORING (Hits only)

Hits must be in scoreable areas.
Anything touching the line is considered a MISS.
2 Hits must be in each target for a total of 10.
A reload must have been accomplished before the 5th target.
PACT TIMER run- 5 seconds period.

TRAINING AIDS/EQUIPMENT:

Range, 5 Tran-Star II or 5 QIT targets, 10 rounds of ammunition, PACT TIMER or computerized target system. Box of Tissues.

TRAINING VENUE DESCRIPTION/PREPARATION:
Scoring: Number of rounds on each target are 2, for a total of 10 rounds. The scoreable area is the 4/5 ring area (Tran Star-II) or the outer bottle for the QIT target. Unlike most courses of fire, the benefit DOES NOT go to the shooter; liners are considered misses regardless of which side they are located. When scoring this course, if there becomes any doubt on a shot placement, it shall be considered a miss. No questions asked.

Combat Accuracy

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If you want to be a combat-accurate shooter, be a target shooter first.

Experience Earned

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Experience Earned
by MSG Joe Carlos, US Army Reserve (ret.)

I’ve been associated with military shooting teams since the mid-1980s. During this entire period these teams have been underutilized, underfunded, and misunderstood. Until our wars in the Middle East I was one of the few members of the Reserve Team that had a combat patch. Generals and bean counters tended to think that all the shooting teams did was punch holes in paper and win trophies. When 9/11 hit all that changed real fast, however. Reservists and National Guardsmen from their respective shooting teams stepped forward and volunteered. Some were sent into combat but, fortunately, enough people in charge had the sense to assign most of the shooters as instructors and range cadre at the various Mobilization Stations or Power Projection Platforms.

At these Mob Stations each soldier has to review and demonstrate proficiency in his particular job skills, be it Infantryman, Motor Transport Operator, or Human Resources Specialist. Everyone also has to qualify with his individually assigned weapon, usually an M16/M4. I have all the respect in the world for Drill Sergeants and was one for many years, but Drill Sergeants have to cover all the tasks taught in Initial Entry (basic) Training from Drill and Ceremonies to Combatives. If your son or daughter was mobilizing, would you want any random Drill Sergeant supervising their marksmanship training or would you rather have an instructor that wore a Distinguished Badge on their chest and a President’s Hundred Tab on their sleeve?

When experience in the Gulf demonstrated the need to reach out a little farther on the battlefield, the active component considered all those old Viet Nam-era M14s that had been stored away. However, few personnel knew squat about M14s or shooting at distance because many active duty soldiers put in 20 years to punch the retirement ticket and get out, leaving no institutional knowledge. Reserve component soldiers (Guard and Reserve) tend to stick around longer because the military is supposed to be part time, with some remaining 30 or 40 years. Many on the two reserve shooting teams not only knew the M14 but had earned their Distinguished Rifleman badges with them and were able to show the active component how to do things right. The level of commitment went even further than that. With only 20 or 30 people slotted a military rifle team there wasn’t enough to handle the entire workload. Retired shooting team members stepped forward to help out, not unlike civilian competition shooters teaching marksmanship during the two world wars.

As time went on Designated Marksman training grew. The concept has at least one person per squad trained in long range precision shooting, not as a sniper but as a superior marksman. This person could be equipped with an M14 or M16 with ACOG or similar optical sight. After the fact, a number of organizations tried to lay claim to the Designated Marksman program but it was mostly reserve component shooting team members having competed internationally doing the the lion’s share of the development using lessons learned in those military shooting competitions. When I hear bean counters, politicians, and even other soldiers claiming shooting teams don’t contribute it riles me up and should anger you as well. A military rifle team can be completely funded for the cost of one cruise missile!

Most of the knowledge and research I write in my articles was learned during my decade-plus tenure as a competitor and armorer with the Army Reserve Marksmanship Program.

IPSC Shooter Wins Fight

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Two guys picked the wrong place to rob

Recently found footage of such an incident has surfaced. The video depicts a robbery in progress at a Duncanville store.

Apparently the gentleman in question used a Glock 23 and is an active IPSC (International Practical Shooting Confederation) shooter.

The perpetrator that went down in the shop was out of the fight immediately, shot in his chest. There was an exchange of gunfire between the shop owner and a criminal which was later found dead.

http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=c69_1409727286

http://www.liveleak.com/ll_embed?f=86df0a88a0ff&start=90

Fight starts at 1:32

Competition Shooting Value

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Differences and similarities of civilian competition and combat shooting
by Karl Rehn
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