SACRA Competitor Overview

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Civilians, South African National Defence Force (SANDF) enlisted and commissioned, Department of Correctional Services, and the South African Police Service compete at provincial and national competitions around the country.

New Zealand Service Rifle

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http://www.sportsground.co.nz/nzservicerifle

An overview of competitive shooting with members of the New Zealand Service Rifle Association.

Gunsmithing in South Africa

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South African Combat Rifle Association 2016 Championships
General De Wet Range, Bloemfontein

Ettienne Maritz, Precision Ballistics Pty Ltd and South African Army Reserve Force Shooting Team, and Johan Horn, police officer and armourer with the South African Police Service, discuss gunsmithing in South Africa.

Johan Horn, SAPS Armourer

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Johan Horn, a police officer and armourer with the South African Police Service discusses setting up R4, R5, and Galil rifles for Service Conditions competition.

SANDF Marksmanship Programs

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SGM Strydom of the South African National Defence Force discusses marksmanship training and competition in South Africa.

Combat and Competition

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An overview of the similarities and differences of training for combat compared to competition as experienced by a combat veteran, sniper, drill sergeant, and competitive shooter with the U.S. Army Reserve Marksmanship Program.

An overview of the similarities and differences of training for combat compared to competition. Are there any actual bad habits or training scars caused by fixed, square range competition courses?

Here’s my take. I suspect “training scar” claims occur more from novice skill levels rather than learning a “bad” habit. When academy/basic training remains the totality of formal learning a person has, they’re more likely to repeat such things because it’s the only response available in a rather limited base of experience, especially when there is little to no history of performing at a higher level while under pressure where the results are measured and truly matter to them.

As the two military combat veterans in these videos explain, we shot a series of surprise courses at CAFSAC in the shoot houses at Connaught, Ottawa. Despite shooting these multiple courses after the fixed, square range courses (the sort that allegedly cause “training scars”) not a single competitor displayed any such mistake. None of the range officers reported anyone inadvertently remaining flat footed when they should have been moving, failing to use cover, unloading before finding and engaging targets, etc. It’s almost as if being more skillful and being used to performing at a higher level while under pressure where the results matter helps people perform better while under pressure. And they could perform appropriately according to the given context/situation at hand. Amazing!

Others have experienced the exact same thing:

Yep, despite not doing a “scan and assess” after shooting a stage, when it came time to replicate things in as real of environment as possible, I kept my guard up and kept treating it as “real”, even though it wasn’t.

It’s almost as if my mind and body know when I’m gaming, and when I’m not.

http://www.exurbanleague.com/misfires/2015/09/30/so-just-what-is-a-training-scar

 

South African Top Lady Shooters

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Louise Seymore and Ronelle Alberts were the top Lady shooters at the 2016 South African Combat Rifle Association championships and in the Top 50 Shoot Off. Here is how they got their start.

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