Running and Shooting Demographics

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Running USA reported on road race participation numbers.
2016 State of the Sport – U.S. Road Race Trends
The second running boom appears to be backing off as runners retreat from non-traditional races.
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Preparation

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A nice quote from Greg Everett. This applies equally to problems in fitness training and tactical training.

“Being prepared for any random task is not the same thing as preparing randomly for any task.”

Barbell Training in the Military

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A military Physical Fitness Test is not designed to measure combat effectiveness, nor is it designed to measure combat readiness. Physical Fitness Tests are wellness assessments for hygiene designed to ensure a minimal level of fitness necessary to avoid medical problems, not for improved performance.

Here is how to do it better and actually improve performance.

Starting Strength and Barbell Training in the Military
by
Lt. Col. Christian “Mac” Ward

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Fitness is Hygiene

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Hygiene [hy·giene]
noun
conditions or practices conducive to maintaining health and preventing disease

Maintaining minimum physical fitness is a form hygiene and failing to do so is unhygienic.
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P90X3 Results

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Four Buzzfeed staffers follow P90X3 for three months and report on their “gains.”

https://www.yahoo.com/health/we-worked-out-for-90-days-straight-and-this-is-118867976882.html

TL;DR
Starting advice to the 150 pound, 11% BF, 22 BMI male was there was “no need” to gain muscle mass or size, though it was suggested to the 140 pound, 8.8% BF male to gain a bit.

Results of 90 days were a few pounds lost among the females and a slight increase in size on the small male who is now almost 150 pounds (9 pounds gained) after three months. No report on any actual fitness or performance metric was taken or mentioned.

Rifle Shooting May Predict Your Lifespan

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Simple Sitting Test Predicts How Long You’ll Live
Flexibility, balance and muscle strength are key indicators of longevity.
by Becky Lang
Discover Magazine November 2013

http://discovermagazine.com/2013/nov/05-sit-down

Brazilian physician Claudio Gil Araujo noticed long ago patients having trouble with motions such as bending down to pick up something off the floor or easily rising from a seated position indicated a loss of muscle, balance, and flexibility, all which indicate an increased chance of mortality.

Araujo eventually developed a simple test requiring no equipment called the Sitting-Rising Test. In a study published in the European Journal of Cardiology, Araujo had more than 2,000 patients ages 51 to 80 at at Clinimex Exercise Medicine Clinic in Rio de Janeiro take the SRT. The study concluded that people scoring less then eight points on the SRT were twice as likely to die within the next six years compared with those scoring higher and scoring scored three points or less indicated a 500% increased chance of dying within the same period compared with those scoring more than eight points. Each point increase in SRT score was associated with a 21 percent decrease in mortality from all causes.

To perform the SRT, sit down on the ground. Using no support is a perfect score of five. Using your hands or forearms on the ground or your body to help is a one point deduction for each contact. Appearing to lose balance is a half point. Then stand up, with the same scoring and deductions. Add them together for total score.

These illustrations from Discover Magazine shows how to perform the Sitting-Rising Test (SRT).


If you imagine a rifle in that woman’s hands, you’ll notice she basically assumed a cross leg sitting position. Being able to get smoothly into and out of a sitting position with a rifle in your hands and using minimal to no support to do so yields a high SRT score. As with your marksmanship, shooting seated from a bench is also harmful to your health.

Medical professionals have spoken. An ability to get into and out of rifle shooting positions indicates a maintenance of sufficient muscle, flexibility, and balance for long, healthy life. Dry practice and live fire regularly from field shooting positions. It’s for your health!

More:
http://startingstrength.com/training/modifying-the-program-for-geezers

Functional Fitness and Practical Shooting Skills

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Observations from Jess Banda, Everyday No Days Off
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