How to improve your handgun accuracy

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Anthony Maldonado has over Thirty (30) years of experience in the field of hunting, sports and self-defense related fields. Now he keeps on doing it through teaching others about how to prepare and DIY. He is an expert in the area of DIY. He is presently working at his tenbesttipz.com


How to improve your handgun accuracy

by Anthony Maldonado
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Training Incest

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by Sgt. Chuck Humes

Ask yourself: Is my current level of training as good as, better than or inferior to what’s being utilized across the country? Everyone would like to believe that the training provided to him or her is state of the art. After all, your life and the lives of those you protect depend upon it. But the million-dollar question that everyone should ask themselves in regards to assessing the quality of their own training is: “How do I know?” What have you compared it to? Unless you’re exposed to outside training to compare your own to, how can you possibly know if the training you are receiving is as good as you’ve been led to believe?

When law enforcement agencies (or any organization) remain secluded from other outside resources, it creates a form of unconscious incompetence that I call training incest. Seriously, there really is a reason you shouldn’t marry your sibling and have children. It’s the same reason agencies need to be exposed to extramural training genes (i.e., outside principles, concepts, techniques, methodologies and training drills).

When an agency retains and secludes the same in-house training “genes” passed down from generation to generation of training officers, you can end up with training that’s the human equivalent of the supporting cast of Deliverance. With no new ideas, concepts or tactics ever entering the picture, you’ll get less than optimal results. Isolated agency’s training officers will pass on the same techniques and principles they were taught. Doing so in a robotic fashion that rarely, if ever, reaches the training standard that they could achieve with exposure to different perspectives and fresh ideas. Law enforcement training has some incredibly talented people, but no one knows everything about any particular aspect. However, by sharing our collective knowledge, we can keep the training “gene pool” from stagnating.

For some individual officers that read this, you might be stuck in a fishbowl of inbred, stagnated training, and have never even thought about it until now. Such inbreeding is created by agencies that seclude themselves from the training gene pool. In such a case, it’s up to you to climb out and see if there isn’t a better, (particularly if that means safer) way to perform different aspects of your job.

More:
http://lawofficer.com/training/training-incest/

JROTC Ceremonial Rifles Fundraiser

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Reader Levi McClure is running a fundraiser to restore ceremonial M1903A3 for a Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps program. Help out if you can!

https://www.gofundme.com/jrotc-ceremonial-rifles

My mission is to ensure the young ladies and gentlemen of the Baumholder middle/high school have ceremonial M1903A3 rifles worthy of their professionalism. Please visit my GoFundMe link to help out.

I have taken on the daunting task of restoring the ceremonial M1903A3 (de-mil) rifles for my local high school JROTC. These rifles that are used at military ceremonies and sporting events have fallen into a state of disrepair over the years. The state of these rifles have become so distressed that many of them are almost completely broken in half. I am a certified gunsmith committed to ensuring these young ladies and gentlemen can be proud to look their best during these ceremonies.

With budgeting cuts by the government, programs such as JROTC do not get the much-needed support they deserve. I have resolved to contribute the necessary hours to refurbish the rifles to something these cadets deserve. Wood restoration, metal fabrication, and parts replacement will ensure I achieve my goal for the future leaders of our military. Your contributions will provide new stocks that will be brought to a high ceremonial mirror finish, replacement parts for what I cannot repair or fabricate myself, chrome dip finish for that extra pizzaz, and period correct white leather slings. I thank you in advance for your contribution in ensuring these young cadets can match their professional appearance with their already outstanding professional demeanor.
– Levi McClure

https://www.gofundme.com/jrotc-ceremonial-rifles

Paul Deugan on Skill Development

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SFC Paul Deugan is a champion-level shooter with the National Guard’s All Guard Team, the MAC V (Marksmanship Advisory Council) Regional Representative, combat veteran, and Co-Owner & Instructor at Kinetic Fundamentals, LLC.

https://www.kinetictacticaltraining.com/
https://www.facebook.com/kineticfundamentals/

Here are his thoughts on skill development.
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Archerytopic.com: 10 Items You Should Have In Your Deer Hunting Pack

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Robert Gate at Archerytopic.com submitted the following article. Enjoy!

Deer hunting can be fun or a nightmare at some point depending on what you have carried in your hunting pack. It is always important that you get to pick the essential tools that will make your hunting easier. Many people will have different things on their lists, below are some of the important items you should never miss the next time you go out hunting for deer.

1. Scents and Lures

Scents and Lures

Today, various options exist when it comes to deer attractant. These are the items that will support you in attracting the deer to your position. Such can include having a deer decoy and scents that would make the deer think their fellow mates are in your position. Without a doubt, you should now be ready to take your shot when the deer end up in your staged location with scents and lures.

Having deer calls could be another great addition to your lures. Make sure that you practice using the call before applying it in the real world. The worst can be when you use the call and end up with the wrong tone.

2. Power Bank or Battery Pack

Power Bank or Battery Pac

Having a battery pack is important to help you recharge your phone or any other application that might need power while outdoors with no access to a power outlet. A charged phone could come in handy in a place where you are lost and need help.

3. Extra Clothes

Extra Clothes

Even it is hunting in the wild, you still want to have a change of clothes, especially if you are going to be out there for a few days. Well, you do not have to pack as if you were traveling. Just get the necessary clothes as you might not have to change daily. Do not over-pack, as it might make your luggage heavy all for nothing.

4. Flashlight and Matches

Flashlight and Matches

It does not matter which you choose, but just make sure that you have light especially when it gets dark. It can be quite tough to hunt at night if you do not have enough illumination. You could still use the fire for keeping yourself warm during the chilly nights other than help with visibility. Just be sure that at the camp they allow for lighting the fire. The flashlight, on the other hand, should help you get back to the campsite if it gets dark while hunting.

5. Water and Energy Bars

Water and Energy Bars

You have to keep yourself refreshed so that you get to stay in focus while outdoors hunting for deer. The water is important for hydration so that you can maintain focus. The energy bars should help give you more energy for hunting before you can get access to food later on after your hunting trip.

6. Compass and Updated Map

Compass and Updated Map

Having a proper sense of direction is always important to make sure that you end up at the right place all the time. It is the reason you must have a compass and an updated map for you to use. The compass can also help you in finding your deer after shooting it. If you shoot it in your stand, make sure to note the direction of your compass before descending.

7. Hunting Knife

Hunting Knife

The knife does not have to be always used on the deer. Sometimes you get into scenarios where having a knife could come in handy. So make sure to get one for yourself for the next hunting trip.

8. License

License

Having your hunting license is always important. You do not want to get in trouble with the authorities when asked about your license and permit. Always have it in your hunting pack at all times.

9. Binoculars and Rangefinder

Binoculars and Rangefinder

It can be binocular or monocular, you simply have to choose what works for you in terms of usability features. The binoculars and rangefinder are important to help you assess just how far you are from your target and also spot them at a distance. Miss them and you will wish you had carried one with you before going to hunt.

10. Gloves

Gloves

You should not leave home without the gloves. They are not only important for keeping you warm, but also great for protection. You can never know what you get to touch while outdoors in the wild. The gloves can also be great to use with a scent killer to keep your scent to a minimum.

At least you now have an idea about the top 10 items you can never miss in your deer hunting pack. You could always add more to your list depending on your needs as a person. If you have the right items, then your hunting trip will have fewer issues of inconveniences, and you should get hunting done effectively.

Robert Gate is the founder of Archerytopic.com. He was enthusiastic about hunting from the first shot, from then he decided to become a pro hunter. If you find something helpful on his blog, he would be proud to hear from you.

PDF version:
10 Items You Should Have In Your Deer Hunting Pack

Analysis: The Army has a range problem, but it’s not because of the 5.56 round

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[G]iving soldiers a more reliable weapon with greater range is kinda pointless if we don’t address one of the Army’s most persistent and glaring faults: its marksmanship program sucks. There’s no one part of the thing we can point to as being problematic. It’s not just the BRM taught at Basic, or the qualification tables. The whole thing, from start to finish, really, really, sucks.

What’s the point of giving soldiers a shiny, new rifle if they can’t hit the broadside of a barn with the one they’ve got?

Now, before you break out the pitchforks and your Expert qualification badges, sit down and think about what I’m saying. Unless your MOS directly involves shooting things in the face, when was the last time you went to the range during the workday for something other than qualification? When was the last time you broke out the rifles for anything other than to qualify, or to clean them for inspection?

For most of you, that answer will be either the last time you deployed, or never. And that’s a huge problem.

Over the last ten-and-a-half years in the North Carolina Army National Guard, I’ve spent more time being told not to kill myself or rape people than how to shoot. I don’t have a problem with qualification myself; I can reliably shoot high sharpshooter to low expert. But I also make a point to shoot recreationally whenever I can. Not everyone has that option, and plenty of folks who do don’t take advantage of it.

For most folks, the entirety of their marksmanship training will consist of three weeks in Basic, the few days out of the year when they go qualify, and maybe a few days or even a week or two of extra training when they mobilize. And that simply isn’t enough.

Nevermind that the Army’s qualification system is stupid and outdated. Shooting static popup targets at ranges between 50-300 meters is a good start, but to rely on that as the sole measure of a soldier’s ability to engage the enemy is insane. According to the Army Times article linked up at the top, one of the driving forces behind looking for a new round is the fact that something like half of all firefights occurred at ranges greater than 300 meters. Meanwhile, your average soldier doesn’t even bother shooting at the 300 meter targets, because they know they can’t hit the damn things.

If the Army’s quest for a new sidearm is any indication, the search for a new rifle will take at least a decade, untold millions of dollars, a half-dozen Congressional inquiries and investigations, and probably a few lawsuits before they settle on the final product. Which means there’s plenty of time to teach soldiers how to shoot before the new gear ever starts filtering its way through the system.

As a starting point, come up with a comprehensive training plan that utilizes Basic Rifle Marksmanship, then build on that foundation throughout the soldier’s career. Get soldiers to the range more often. Update the qualification tables to more accurately represent the threat they’re expected to face. Enforce qualification standards like PT standards, and offer regular remedial training for folks who fail to meet those standards.

Or just carry on before and put a shiny new rifle in the hands of a kid who barely knows which end goes bang. I watched a guy from our battalion’s Forward Support Company shoot a 6 this year. That’s good enough, right?

Full article:
http://www.wearethemighty.com/tactical/analysis-the-army-has-a-range-problem-but-its-not-because-of-the-5-56-round

You Can’t Use Your Sights in a Gunfight

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When I was still in uniformed patrol, I happened to be about a block away when another officer pulled into a restaurant parking lot just as two men were pulling masks over their face and getting ready to enter the restaurant. One had already drawn a handgun. When the suspects saw the marked car, they ran and immediately split up. The other officer chased the one who went east, and I saw the one who went north jump a fence into an apartment complex.

I gave chase and the suspect ran down into a creek, tripped in the mud on the opposite bank, and then flipped over on his back. It was night time, but the moon and a street light on a nearby bridge provided sufficient light for us to see each other clearly. The world slowed down for me as he reached into his waistband. I was approximately 30 yards behind him as I drew my pistol, brought it to eye level, and transitioned from focusing on him to focusing on the front sight. As I was pulling the trigger my subconscious screamed out to me that something wasn’t right. I focused back on the suspect and realized what he pulled out of his waistband was a cell phone. I believe you could classify being in a foot chase with an armed robbery suspect, alone, in the dark, and having to decide whether to shoot or not shoot qualifies as a stressful event. Yet, I was able to transition from target to sight to target for the simplest of reasons. I was trained to, and I had been through realistic force on force training that had made focusing on my sights instinctive.

I’ve spoken to a multitude of officers and armed citizens who have fired their weapons under stress. In one particularly relevant story, a rookie officer, still in his first few months on the street, was confronted by an armed suspect firing from behind a car door. The rookie had cover and was returning fire. In his own words, “I fired 5 to 6 shots very quickly, realized I was not being effective, and then slowed down and really concentrated on the front sight.” After the initial shock of being fired on dissipated, he was able to realize why he was being ineffective, fall back on his training, and use his sight to get good hits and survive the encounter.

Massad Ayoob relates similar conversations in this 2014 article in which he says, “I’ve lost count of how many gunfights I’ve studied where the survivor said something like, ‘I was pointing the gun and firing as best I could and nothing was happening. Then I remembered to aim with my sights, and the other guy went down and it was over.’”

John McPhee, the owner of SOB Tactical, confirms that it is not only possible to use your sights in actual gunfights, but it is key to your success. John, a retired special operations soldier with extensive combat experience from Bosnia and Iraq, has related to me that he was able to use his sights during stressful situations. In addition, when witnessing other soldiers shoot, they were obviously using their sights even if they had no conscious awareness of doing so. In his words, “Gun comes to the eye, shots are taken and gun is lowered. How does a guy bring the sight to his eye and not see it and… shoot perfect shots?” John also makes no bones that training to use your sights is imperative for success in combat shooting. “You have to train to see the sights every shot. When the time comes, you will do it so fast that the brain’s subconscious will do all this quicker than the conscious can even remember it.”

Read more:
http://www.luckygunner.com/lounge/cant-use-sights-gunfight/

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